Category: Community

Community social gatherirngs; mens and womens groups; covenant groups, neighbourhood groups and news from the communications, membership and care and concern committees.

Friday Film Nights in May
Asian Heritage Month 2021

BIPOC CaucusAsian Heritage Month Resources ListFriday Film Nights in May


Due to Covid-19 restrictions, just click on the video links to watch the films at your convenience. Then meet-up via Zoom on Fridays (7-8pm) for a lively discussion.

May 7   — Chinese Cafe in Saskatchewan
May 14 — Chinese Musqueam Stories
May 21 — Ru-Tsu
May 28 — Asian Comedy Night

Everyone welcome from the congregation and the greater community


image of restaurant interior by Karen Tam

Q&A May 7th 7-8pm

  Chinese Restaurants: Episode 12 (26.47 MINS)

A visit to the New Outlook Cafe in Saskatchewan. Producer and director Cheuk Kwan will join us from Toronto for the Q&A.


photo

Q&A May 14th 7-8pm

Guest Panelists

Howard Grant, Wade Grant and Sarah Ling


Trilogy: Chinese Musqueam Stories

  CBC Gem: All Our Father’s Relations (43:39 MINS)

This film helps to record and revitalize the interconnected histories of Chinese Canadian and First Nations relations along the Fraser River in British Columbia … both peoples supported one another in the face of marginalization and racism … (full synopsis)


  Larry Grant: Intertwining Cultures (11:22 MINS)

  Larry Grant: Not Belonging (11:03 MINS)

Honouring Musqueam elder Larry Grant, his parents and the Grant family history. His mother Agnes Grant was the last fluent-speaker of the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ language in their community. His father Hong Tim Hing emigrated, in 1920, at the age of 14 from a village in southern China to Vancouver, BC, on the unceded territory of the Musqueam hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓-speaking people, where he worked at the Lin On market garden on Musqueam Indian Reserve #2.


map

Above: Hand drawn map of the historic Chinese market gardens on Musqueam Reserve #2. The Shaughnessy Golf & Country Club* is located on land immediately east of the former market gardens

*4300 SW Marine Drive, Vancouver BC



photo

Q&A May 21st 7-8pm

  Ru-tsu (14.02 MINS)

In this CBC Short Doc, David Suzuki’s grandson, documentary film maker and professional snowboarder Tamo Campos searches for his roots across the Pacific. As he snowboards the mountains of Hokkaido, he makes connections with the Ainu, the Indigenous people of Japan. Tamo to join for Q&A


May 28th Asian Comedy Night
Stand-up Comics take potshots at racial stereotypes and much more. They’re so funny you may cry !!

image

image

photo of standup comic Jinx Yeo

J
oin us on the evening of May 28th, 7-8pm, for a lively discussion on comedy and stand-up comics challenging racial stereotypes and racialized identities

Asian Heritage Month Resource List

BIPOC CaucusAsian Heritage Month Resources ListFriday Film Nights in May

A list of resources for Asian Heritage Month suggested by the UCV BIPOC Caucus


UCV Friday Night Films during Asian Heritage Month

Friday Night Films 7-8pm, May 2021

Training workshop

hollaback! Bystander Intervention (free, one hour)

Books and Writers

Recommended by Meena:

Recommended by Cynthia:

  • The Diary of Dukesang Wong: A voice from Gold Mountain, the only known first person account by a Chinese worker on the construction of the CPR. Edited by David McIlwraith, diary translated by granddaughter Wanda Joy Hoe. 2020
  • Bird Tracks in the Air, 2021.By Profs Jan Walls and Yvonne Walls, renowned scholars of Chinese language and literature. The book is composed of the translated poems of revered poet and political reformer Wang Anshi, whose was committed to compassion and social justice ( a comparative study with Unitarian 7 principles). Virtual book launch with both authors

Recommended by Megumi:

Recommended by Glenn:

  • A Fine Balance, Rohinton Mistry. This is my favourite novel about India and one of my favourite novels by living writers
  • The God of Small Things and My Seditious Heart, Arundhati Roy. The second book is Roy’s recently published collection of nonfiction
  • Imaginary Homelands, Salman Rushdie. Though it is not exclusively about South Asia, I really enjoyed this collection of essays and journals
  • Running in the Family, Michael Ondaatje. This is a memoir about O’s family’s life in Sri Lanka. I found it to contain his most charming writing

Articles

  • Keeping Love Close, The New York Times — Beautiful article and photographs of Asian love in a time of hate. Asian and Asian-American photographers show what love looks like

Video suggestions

Music

Asian Canadian community organizations fighting for social justice and equality

Cultural and Historical societies

Arts and Culture resources

Asian Heritage Month: image of Vietnamese blue dragon

Vietnamese Blue Dragon by Goran tek-en
CC By SA 4.0

Update from the Refugee Committee

The refugee committee has been busy submitting applications to fill the 50 allocations we have been allocated (one allocation/one person).

We have good news from one of our sponsored young people who has completed his accountant training, started working in his field, is getting married soon and will be a father in the fall. His sponsorship ended in November 2020.

The more recent arrivals are doing well.

The arrivals are still rare due to COVID and depend on the overseas offices ability to process applications, ability to interview, to do security checks which are usually extensive, to have a medical assessment and to have flights available and allowed to depart and land in Canada.

We have much more demands for sponsorship than we have allocations which is quite heartbreaking as so many are in unsafe and dire situations, including children.

We are very grateful for the support we get and the donations that allow us to bring refugees to safety. We could not do what we do otherwise.

A reminder that private sponsors are required to support the sponsored for one year with monthly allowance plus start up costs (furniture, bathroom needs, kitchen wares etc…).

Please contact the refugee committee if you have any questions

May is Asian Heritage Month

In recognition of May being Asian Heritage Month, the newly-formed UCV BIPOC Caucus will be hosting a series of weekly Friday Film Night events.
A list of relevant resources can be found here.

A brief history of four major Asian communities in Canada:

The earliest Chinese settlers arrived on the shore of Canada’s west coast to help build a trading post for beaver pelts in 1788. Now there are 1.8 million people reported being of Chinese origin.

Japanese first recorded arrival was 1877. They worked mostly in fishing, farming and logging industries. The 2016 census reported 121,485 people of Japanese origin.

South Asians came mostly from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. Their first recorded arrival was 1903. They worked almost exclusively in the lumber industry. 1, 963,330 Canadians reported South Asian origins in the 2016 census.

Filipinos first reported arrival in Canada was 1965. Most came in the 70’s. Many work in health and are care providers. 837,130 people reported being of Filipino ethnic origin in the 2016 Census.

More information on Asian Canadian history. Excerpts from “The Canadian Encyclopedia” (Maybe just post the links?): 

– The first Chinese people to settle in Canada were 50 artisans who accompanied Captain John Meares in 1788 to help build a trading post and encourage trade in sea otter pelts between Guangzhou, China, and Nootka SoundBritish Columbia. Chinese Canadians are one of the largest ethnic groups in the country. In the 2016 census, 1.8 million people reported being of Chinese origin. Despite their importance to the Canadian economy, including the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR), many European Canadians were historically hostile to Chinese immigration. A prohibitive head tax restricted Chinese immigration to Canada from 1885 to 1923. From 1923 to 1947, the Chinese were excluded altogether from immigrating to Canada. (By Anthony B. Chan)

https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/chinese-canadians

– The first generation of Japanese immigrants, called Issei, arrived between 1877 and 1928, and the second after 1967. The 2016 census reported 121,485 people of Japanese origin in Canada, or 0.35 per cent of the Canadian population. The first generations of Japanese Canadians were denied the full rights of citizens, such as the right to vote in provincial and federal elections and to work in certain industries. During the Second World War, the federal government interned and dispossessed over 20,000 Japanese Canadians. (By Anne Sunshara)

https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/japanese-canadians

South Asians trace their origins to South Asia, which encompasses India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. Most South Asian Canadians are immigrants or descendants of immigrants from these countries, but immigrants from South Asian communities established during British colonial times also include those from East and South Africa, Guyana, Trinidad and Tobago, Fiji and Mauritius. Others come from Britain, the US and Europe. In the 2016 census, 1, 963,330 Canadians reported South Asian origins. (By Norman Buchignani)

https://thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/south-asians

– Immigration to Canada from the Philippines is relatively recent: it began in the 1970s. In the 2016 Census, 837,130 people reported being of Filipino ethnic origin. Filipino Canadians thus constitute the largest group of Southeast Asian Canadians (By Eleanor R. Laquian)

https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/filipinos

May 2021 Message from Board President

Dear Unitarian Friends,

Happy Asian Heritage Month! I encourage you all to visit the Alliance For Arts and Culture website to find out about resources and upcoming events for those looking to learn about and celebrate the legacy of Asian Canadians both past and present.

Speaking of learning, our Decolonizing Practices Workshop for staff, board and membership was a ground breaking first step on a long, fulsome journey for this organization. In the months ahead and throughout next year, there will be more anti-racist and anti-oppression engagement so stay tuned!

As you know, the Board recently approved a new Organizational Design that will clarify lines of communication and accountability for everyone. It also frees up the Board to become a more Strategic Board as opposed to a Liason Board. The most significant difference is that the job of the Board – to further the mission and vision of the congregation – will now be their top priority. Management oversight of day to day operations will be the responsibility of a small body made up of Board and staff. Our fabulous new Congregational Administrator Casey Wallace along with HR is in the process of hiring our new Membership Outreach Coordinator. This role was created as part of our new org design as well.

Speaking of things a Strategic Board does, we created a UCV Task Force for Sanctuary Upgrades and hired two professionals in technical theatre to work with them who will ensure that this massive task is done well, on time, and within budget. The upgrades to our sound and lighting systems and chairs replacing pews will make our Sanctuary more flexible and thus inclusive to diverse spiritual practices (walking meditation, circle dance), artistic expression (jazz/choral groups, cabaret fundraisers, writers festival venue,) and wheelchair accessibility.

The Board recently refreshed and strengthened our commitment to our Covenant of Healthy Relations and adopted a new policy around disruptive behaviour. Please take a moment to read the Covenant below and remember to be kind. Covid has taken a toll on everyone, and we must remember to breathe and think before we act.

Finally, I would just like to reiterate how in awe I am of our membership and the energy and commitment we continue to exert toward furthering our values and principles. From lovingly tended gardens on our campus to refugees being sponsored to wild salmon being defended in partnership with First Nations, Vancouver Unitarians can and are changing the world, helping to transform it into a more compassionate and equitable one. Meaningful action creates hope. So stay actively engaged, fellow Unitarians, and take care. We will gather in person again soon.

In hope and faith,

Diane

Covenant of Healthy Relations
This is a covenant to guide how we behave towards each other and to groups and individuals within the congregation. The objective is to enhance a safe climate that is courteous, friendly, supportive, respectful of others, open and honest.
Because I believe in the inherent worth and dignity of each person, I will endeavour to:
1. Be compassionate and supportive in my relationships with others, assume their best intentions and be curious rather than judgmental.
2. Communicate with active listening and consideration. Explain concerns to the person directly and share differences respectfully. Focus on the current problem – not the person.
3. Balance being open to new ideas with respect for our traditions.
4. Be attentive to our community’s needs, generous with my talents and careful with the church’s resources.
5. Keep the big picture in mind, be patient with myself and others and stay engaged in the process of change; participate in the decision-making and respect the decisions that are made.
6. Discuss conflicts in our church in a way that respects the privacy and dignity of those involved.
7. Recognize and praise others and myself for the work we do in the church and be forgiving when we make mistakes.
8. Support, in a constructive way, the work of the minister, staff and congregants.
9. Deepen our connections by getting to know and understand people of all ages and points of view within the congregation.
10. Nurture my own spiritual needs in this community and support others in their search for truth and meaning.

 

April 2021 Update from the Board of Trustees

Dear Unitarian Friends,

With the blossoming of spring comes hope, light, and a sense of comfort born from Mother Natures faithfulness to us. To top off this seasonal levity, here is some good news from your diligent Board of Trustees.

The Buildings and Grounds Committee and members of the Executive Board continue to work hard on the Sanctuary Upgrades; a Forum will be scheduled soon so please stay tuned.

After soliciting input from the congregation via email, phone and forum, the Board approved the new Organizational Design that was recommended by one of the Ministerial Transition Team task forces, and it is being implemented with some tweaks and adjustments. This design streamlines and clarifies lines of accountability and underscores a collaborative, communicative working environment. It also means that we are going to hire a Membership/Outreach Coordinator to help build our membership and engage with the wider community.

The Board also engaged the congregation via email, phone and forum in a conversation about extending the Interim Ministerial time an extra year. After considering all of the feedback, the Board has decided to extend our Interim Ministerial time an extra year.

Finally, the Decolonizing Practices Workshop is full! Looking forward to seeing everyone who signed up for it on Saturday April 24 from 10 – 3; zoom link to come.

As always, if you have any questions or comments, feel free to email me at president@vancouverunitarians.ca

Happy spring,
Diane.

Women’s Memoir Writing Series

Note: This series is now at capacity.

If you registered by sending an email to Mary prior to Saturday, March 27, and haven’t received a confirmation email, please send another email to the address below.

Our Lives as Stories

Maybe you would like to commit to paper (or your laptop) a few of the stories knocking around inside you. Maybe you’re seeking a new way to deepen your understanding of yourself and your connection with others. Or maybe you’ve been longing to write your memoir. Whichever is the case, this series of workshops could get you started.

Session 1: Finding Stories. (Gathering the Sensory and Emotive Details)

Session 2: The Craft and Building Blocks of Stories.  (Writing the Scene(s))

Session 3: From Draft to Polished. (Giving and Receiving Feedback)

⦁ The three two-hour workshops will be spaced a month apart providing lots of time in between for other activities.
⦁ For the first two sessions, the whole group (up to twenty participants) will meet for instruction and guided exercises. Sharing time will involve breakout rooms of five or six, and everyone will be invited to share a portion of their work with Maggie by email if they wish.
⦁ The third workshop will happen in 3 sessions, with up to six gathering each time, to share their work and give and receive guided feedback.

FREE to UCV members
$100 registration fee for non-members

Bio

Maggie de Vries is the author of eleven books including the Governor General Literary Award nominated Missing Sarah: A Memoir of Loss and teen novel, Rabbit Ears, winner of the Sheila A. Egoff Children’s Literature Prize. Maggie’s TEDxSFU talk The Red Umbrella: Sex Work, Stigma and the Law has been viewed more than forty-thousand times. Hooker Monologues, a collaborative production Maggie co-produced, co-wrote and performed in, staged six sold-out shows at Vancouver’s Firehall Arts Centre in 2016.

Maggie was children’s book editor at Orca Book Publishers for seven years and a substitute teacher in Surrey for five. In 2005 and 2012, she was the inaugural writer in residence at VPL and UNBC respectively. For some years now, she has been a Lecturer in UBC’s Creative Writing Program, and a Martha-Beck-certified Life Coach who mentors writers, runs workshops, leads writing retreats and offers creative writing courses in her Ladysmith, Vancouver Island community and beyond.

She is in the process of reconnecting with UCV, where she was married in 1995 and attended more and more regularly from 1999 until she moved away from the city in 2017.

www.maggiedevries.com

Dates: May 8, May 29 (2 – 4 pm)
and

June 19/20 The last class is meant to be divided into three groups for workshopping, with Maggie present for each one. People will sign up for one of these slots: Saturday: 9:30 to 11:30, 12:30 to 2:30 or 3 to 5 or Sunday: 12:30 to 2:30 or 3 to 5.

Registration required: contact Mary Bennett ucvconnect@gmail.com

Zoom link will be sent to registered participants before the first session.
Minimum: 10; Maximum: 20 participants

Supported by the Vancouver Unitarian Women’s Retreat Fund.

Registration fees and donations will be used to replenish the fund for future events.

Testimonials

Insightful, hardworking, thoughtful and encouraging, Maggie provided the literary expertise to solve the structural and editorial issues that plagued early drafts of my memoir.  Coincidently, she identified areas where I struggled to probe and encouraged me to explore, improve and flourish.  She helped me to dig deeper and write better. Maggie is terrific!

Renée Hetherington, MBA, PhD
Writer, Scientist and Businesswoman
British Columbia, Canada
February, 2021

Maggie de Vries runs a humdinger of a writing retreat. In an island setting, I was so deeply comforted by the schedule she set for us—one I could decide not to partake of at any moment should the writing bug o’er take me or should I simply need a walk in the woods—that I was inspired to fully involve myself in the opportunities. I was encouraged to share my writing, something I’m truly not used to doing, and I found it thrilling; that shell remains open, well after the retreat, and I’m delighted to feel the change.
Maggie took care of each of us by combining inviting reflection and prompt-driven writing sessions, literary focus, and guided workshops with lots of individually spent time too: free writing in our separate (stunningly beautiful) spots and one-to-one sessions with Maggie.  These check-ins allowed us to look wide to see the larger project and then to perceive the minute detail of scene writing and character perspective.
All that Maggie engaged us in over the 3-day retreat stays with me, weeks later, because I heard myself articulate a deep desire to do this. I said it in a safe and supportive environment; that baby step feels giant to me now. And Maggie helped us envision each of our books in the mess of journals and papers, in the engagement and the intention of the writer. I see these things now. I am showing up for this part of myself.
Thanks, Maggie, for knowing the world of writing so thoroughly and letting us in on its mysteries and delights.

Jane Slemon
Retreat Participant
UCV Member
November, 2019

 

Maggie’s experience as an author and writing coach has given me the courage to finally write my memoir. Her guidance has helped me see more clearly how to structure my book, stay true to my purpose, and tell a story that will engage the reader.  I know I couldn’t do this without her expertise and dedicated commitment to my project. Thank you, Maggie

Jeri Ross, MPH
Licensed Health Educator & Entrepreneur
Author of See You in the Sky: A Memoir of Prison, Possibility and Peace
Santa Cruz, California
June, 2018

 

PDF Description

Women’s Memoir Writing Series – Google Docs

 

 

Mystery Pals Deluxe 2021

Tangible Connection and a Break from Monotony

I feel a great desire for spring, for unplugging, for tangible connections to people. Zoom and video calls help me connect with people far away, but boy am I missing people’s prescence! How about some old-fashioned letter writing? It’s the time of year when we roll out Mystery Pals letter exchange for children, youth, and adults of all ages.  Some wonderful friendships and connections across generations have been made through this annual event–and if you haven’t tried it out yet, I encourage you to sign up!

This year we are forming a small organizing team to spice up our exchanges. Each Pal mails their letters to UCV and we send it on with Artist Trading Cards, art or activity prompts, or poetry slipped in.

Who?

Anyone age 4-104 can participate if you have regularly attended the Unitarian Church of Vancouver for six months or more, are known by someone in our church leadership (RE Director, Minister, Board, or committee member, small group leader), and can commit to exchanging weekly letters throughout April by Canada post (envelopes and stamps supplied.) 

When?

April is the month of mail exchange and early May is our Reveal Party where you find out who exactly your Pal is. The reveal party will be facilitated in whatever way is deemed safe at the time–either a zoom party or outdoors if public health allows.

How?

Sign-up with our Breeze form at https://ucv.im/pals by March 15th.

Kiersten and our Pals team will match folks up and assign each Pal pair a famous Unitarian to identify with. You will receive a Letter Writing Kit with addressed envelopes, stamps, and paper at the end of March to get you started. Write an introductory letter to your Pal, mail it to the church and it will be sent on. Watch your mailbox for a response and keep exchanging letters throughout April.

UCV community links and a virtual literature stall

UCV community links keep us connected in these otherwise isolating times. Here is a short list of these links:

https://ucv.im/live … Livestream link for Sunday church services (active at 10:55am every Sunday).
https://ucv.im/oos … An online version of the current Order of Service
https://ucv.im/coffee … Virtual coffee hour – every Sunday immediately following the service
https://ucv.im/give … How to donate from anywhere
https://ucv.im/events … The most frequently updated list of UCV events
https://ucv.im/sermons … A text-based archive of sermons – a virtual literature stall
https://ucv.im/core … An archive of core documents: board minutes, annual reports, …

For these UCV links and more, click here to go to the list at https://ucv.im/ucvlinks-more.

***

Please note a particular item in the list: a link to a list of sermons – a virtual literature stall (lit stall).

After the livestreamed service at ucv.im/live you can go to the list of sermons at ucv.im/sermons to view or download a copy of the prepared text for the sermon if the speaker already provided one.

 


The above is a lit stall post first published on June 9, 2020. The featured image shows the cover of the Order of Service for the preceding Sunday, when a short list of UCV community links like the one above was included. The date now displayed with this post is the date of its latest material update.

The post at ucv.im/ucvlinks is this post. You also can find this post at vancouverunitarians.ca/links.

Or search this website for “links” – with or without quotes – and see this post as the top result.

In the bulleted list below are the three latest posts tagged as lit stall posts.

If you haven’t read it already, please see the post about lit stall posts for more information.

A note on notes and links

 

>>>  what follows is for you if you came here from a footnote  <<<

a link to this post from text that ​adopts its conventions helps the reader

 

​DuckDuckGo bang command​s​ (!?)* ​in this post​ are links. That is, they have links embedded in them. There also may be a link embedded in an asterisk​ – as with the highlighted alert above and the third example below.​

When in parentheses, bang commands link to results of a search for what they follow. When not, they link to results of a search for what they precede:

!yt Unitarian Church of Vancouver / YouTube

!ucv principles for kids / for grownups: UU principles (!g)

Unitarians care less about belief, more about how to live.*

“he taught a way of life” / Salzberg on Goenka on Buddha (!?)

 

So … a bang command here always links to results of a search. An asterisk​ may ​link to ​anything or nothing. If it links to nothing, it refers to a footnote.

An asterisk with a prepended exclamation point looks much like a bang command, but usually links to something other than the results of a search.

The sermons document that lists items in the literature stall (lit stall)* digital archive uses this faux bang command: (!*). Click it and see for yourself.

 


*a link​ –​ see a note on notes and links