Meet some of our active members here.

To see all of the posted testimonials, click here.

To read about some of our members who have been recognized as Unsung Heroes or Lifetime Members, click here.

Lorimer Shenher is a Canadian writer living and working in Greater Vancouver, BC. Lorimer will be giving the Sunday service on Sunday, June 9th, supported by the Unitarian Genders & Sexualities Alliance.

This One Looks Like a Boy is Lorimer’s second book,  published in 2019 by Greystone Books. It tells the story of his life as a transgender man coming to terms with his fear of transitioning to male.
Read the full testimonial.

I became a Unitarian in 1962 in Sarnia, Ontario, then, upon arriving in Vancouver, joined UCV before the move to our present location.

UCV is my spiritual home; our principles and sources seem to fit with the conclusions I have drawn from living a long life. Especially UCVers share my concerns and fears about the present climate catastrophe.I like to think that we as a group can accomplish much more than I could do alone.

Reverend Laura Imayoshi

laura-friedman

Rev. Imayoshi was raised attending the Unitarian Church of Vancouver. She did her undergraduate work in Religious Studies at UBC and her post graduate work at Starr King School for the Ministry in Berkeley, California. Laura trained extensively with the Faithful Fools, an interfaith street ministry in San Francisco. She brought their humour, wisdom and inspiration to Vancouver to start serving in the streets as a Unitarian community minister.

What is Laura’s Ministry?

Rev. Laura Imayoshi has worked with this congregation since 2004, and was ordained here in 2007. Her ministry is about creating meaningful connections between people.  She serves in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, working to build bridges of sharing and understanding between the Downtown Eastside and the Unitarian Church of Vancouver.

Rev. Imayoshi’s ministry has been formally endorsed by the Unitarian Church of Vancouver but she is not paid or employed by the church.

What Is Community Ministry?

In the Thick of Things

A community minister is one who has chosen to build community by working in the community rather than in a parish church. There are four community ministries in Canada, of which two are in the greater Vancouver area.

Community ministry is about taking the values, principles, experience, questioning, and thoughtfulness of Unitarian Universalism and moving  outside of the walls of the church. Community ministers work wherever they are passionate – in hospitals as chaplains, building community gardens, working for legislative change, building a peace movement, running a homeless shelter… the possibilities are as diverse as the people in our congregations.

Unitarians have a rich history of community ministry. One of Vancouver’s community ministers is Reverend Laura Imayoshi.

Role: Librarian on third Sundays
I enjoy meeting members, helping them make book selections and sharing reading experiences.
Read the full testimonial.

Louise has a particular interest in nature religions, wrote the Unitarian Universalist adult religious education curriculum “Paganism 101”, which is used across the denomination, and recently completed her master’s degree in “Myth, Cosmology, and the Sacred” at the University of Canterbury in the UK.
Read the full testimonial.

Catherine Stewart, also a member of the Buildings and Grounds Committee and Coffee Service team, is currently having a show of her work at the Beaty Biodiversity Museum at UBC. Read the full testimonial.

Chris Pearce is a watercolourist, a grandma of two and very active fundrai$ing for the Vancouver GoGo’s.

Huguette is a key person on our Refugee Committee and also the UCV Board. Read the full testimonial.

Diane is a multi award-winning director and actor, and is the long-time Artistic Director of one of Canada’s most resilient and successful independent theatre company’s, Ruby Slippers Theatre. She is the 2017 recipient of the prestigious Bra D’Or Award, a national award annually presented by the Playwrights Guild of Canada, and a 2018 nominee for the Women of Distinction Award, both in recognition of her years of championing works by diverse women. The  principles that guide her work have earned Ruby Slippers Theatre a reputation for radical inclusivity and socially relevant work that illuminates humanity. These Unitarian principles- inclusivity, social responsibility, and a respect for the inter-connectedness of all living things- also guide her personal life, making her an active member of the Unitarian Church of Vancouver, particularly its Environment Committee.

Kiersten is our Director of Children’s and Youth Religious Exploration. At the 2018) Hogwarts Summer Camp, Kiersten taught the herbology classes. The kids made echinacea tincture as well as exploring the various herbs and “weeds” around the congregation’s grounds that can be used for salves and “potions”.This year’s Herbology adventures will be mainly on the garden path labyrinth where a variety of herbs are there for anyone to pick: lavender, sage, echinacea, various mints, rosemary, yarrow.

Kiersten was Professor of Herbology and head of Hufflepuff House. The picture of Kiersten in the hat and square glasses was when she played the part of Professor McGonagall.
This will be Kiersten’s fourth year as director of the children’s and youth program. She strives to find the Fun with Meaning and directs our children, youth, and family programs with a focus on building community, exploring what it means to be Unitarian, questioning, and developing personal relationships with stillness and wonder.

On Jan 19, I  attended ‘Raven People Rising’ at UCV. I feel honoured and truly fortunate to be able to learn more about the Heiltsuk Nation’s powerful journey to protect their territory and surrounding ocean waters. Read the full testimonial.

John Voth’s latest project is creating garden markers for the labyrinth. Mary Bennett had found a photo of something like this and John envisioned something bigger and better! He is using cedar from his Kitsilano trees and burning the letters with a burning tool.
In succeeding years in the fall he will dry them out again sand the face and refresh the letters! At 92 and going strong we expect he’ll be doing that yearly for a long time.

John first joined UCV on November 18, 1962, 57 years ago.

John Voth’s art has had numerous exhibitions at UCV. He invites members to come by his private loft gallery by appointment only. Phone: 604-738-8983

John Voth’s calling card.
Opposing finger and thumb. Artist: John Voth. photo: Keith Wilkinson