Meet some of our active members here. To see all of the posted testimonials, click here.

To read about some of our members who have been recognized as Unsung Heroes or Lifetime Members, click here.

As the daughter of two non-religious scientists, I was never interested in church. As a university student in Montreal I checked out the Unitarians but decided the Sunday services got in the way of skiing, hiking or just sleeping in.  Similarly, once I had a family, Sundays were for the kids’ hockey and soccer games.It wasn’t until five years ago, my kids grown up and gone, when my husband passed away suddenly, that I found a need to find a spiritual community.

I showed up at the North Shore Unitarian church and would sit in the back then slink home after the sermon. I felt I had nothing in common with all those white-haired West Van congregants until one day I joined some church elders at lunch after the service. We were sitting quietly enjoying the soup, when one grey haired lady suddenly slammed her fist on the table and said, “Can you believe what Stephen Harper just did?”  That started a rousing discussion about what was wrong with the latest bill in Ottawa. I sat up and knew right then that I had found my church!

A year later, I moved from North Van to Vancouver and purely because I didn’t want to spend  time commuting, joined UCV. I enjoyed the sermons and the music and this time I was more proactive. I started looking for a group to meet people and be able to help out. I found the Environment Team!

More about Tamiko Suzuki

 

Louise has a particular interest in nature religions, wrote the Unitarian Universalist adult religious education curriculum “Paganism 101”, which is used across the denomination, and recently completed her master’s degree in “Myth, Cosmology, and the Sacred” at the University of Canterbury in the UK. She has been an active member of Unitarian Church of Vancouver since 1996. She has been a lay chaplain, on a ministerial search committee and an active member of the worship committee, among other involvements.

She and three others have recently revitalized the Earth Spirit Council (previously known as the Paganism committee) and is delighted that the group will be facilitating the Paganism 101 curriculum starting in September, 2018.

Louise works as a sculptor and painter with a busy studio on Granville Island. In her artwork, she is inspired by the processes of change and transformation, and is interested in how we, as human beings, embed ourselves in the world, and find meaning during our time here.

“The realm of the artist is the frontier between the tangible world and the intangible one.” Federico Fellini

Whenever I go to a Unitarian church or event, I feel “at home”. Unitarian Universalists are diverse, and congregations are diverse, but I find some things are common in most of them.They are one of the few places where different generations enjoy each other: from babies to centenarians.  We are a rainbow of ages. Since I am a life long Unitarian (I am also a Universalist, but too many syllables), I have experienced our religion from all the ages up to 72, so far.  (More about Karl).

In no particular order, I am an award-winning director and actor, co-founder and long-time Artistic Director of Vancouver’s own Ruby SlippersTheatre. I am the 2017 recipient of the prestigious Bra D’Or award, a national award annually presented by the Playwrights Guild of Canada, in recognition of years of championing works by women. I am a mom. A Masters Degree in Theatre holder. A Unitarian.

There is a paradigm shift going on in the arts, and indeed within society, where inclusivity and diversity are major values of social change and justice. These are Unitarian values. I have been one of many at the forefront of this movement of diversity and inclusivity in the arts..

And thus I invite you to Advance Theatre at the Fringe this year. Every weekday 1:30 pm by donation.

Read about Diane's involvement and Advance Theatre: New Works by Diverse Women

Bruce McIvor attends UCV with his family. He will speak at the forum this Sunday along with four UCV members who have been arrested for protesting Kinder Morgan.

His previous forum was very well attended. So come early and get a good seat!

Dr. Bruce McIvor, lawyer and historian, is principal of First Peoples Law Corporation, a law firm dedicated to defending and advancing Aboriginal title, Aboriginal rights and Treaty rights.
Bruce represents First Nations across Canada.
His recent and ongoing work includes litigation involving treaty rights, the duty to consult,
Aboriginal title and cross-border rights. He also works with numerous clients across Canada to negotiate agreements based on consent and recognition of their Indigenous laws and jurisdiction.

First Peoples Law: Essays on Canadian Law and Decolonization, Bruce’s collection of essays, can be
downloaded for free from our website. Bruce also regularly holds free workshops for Indigenous people
throughout Canada on current issues in Aboriginal law.
Bruce is recognized nationally and internationally as a leading practitioner of Aboriginal law in Canada. He is a proud Métis from the Red River in Manitoba. Bruce holds a law degree, a Ph.D. in Aboriginal and environmental history, and is a Fulbright Scholar.

Scroll down to download his book of essays on First Peoples Law.

Here's what his website says:

For me, advocacy is bred in the bone.

My ancestors experienced the disloyalty of the French and British, the Acadian Explusion, the conquest of New France, the dispossession at Red River and government's refusal to honour the numbered Treaties.

I was focused on working for social justice through an academic career in history until I began working in the law with Louise Mandell, Q.C. (Mandell Pinder) and Stuart Rush, Q.C. (Rush Crane Guenther) on what I expected to be a temporary basis. That was over 15 years ago. Louise and Stuart introduced me to a world of principled, high quality legal advocacy that led me back to university for a law degree.

First Peoples Law combines my passions for law, history and social justice. Most importantly, it allows me to work with other committed professionals in supporting Indigenous Peoples' ongoing struggle for respect and justice.

Email Bruce

Bruce's Linkedin profile

Download Bruce's Bio & CV

Click here to download your free pdf copy, order a paperback copy or do both: https://www.firstpeopleslaw.com/public-edu…/publications.php

We have a limited number of free paperback copies available for non-profit Indigenous organizations in Canada available for the cost of shipping--email us for details enquire@firstpeopleslaw.com

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ABORIGINAL TITLE

The Age of Recognition: The Significance of the Tsilhqot’in Decision

The Downside of the Tsilhqot’in Decision

TREATIES

Is Canada No Longer Responsible for Historical Treaties?

Provinces Burdened with Responsibility for Fulfilling Treaty Promises

What Tsilhqot’in and Grassy Narrows Mean for Treaty First Nations

The Piecemeal Infringement of Treaty Rights

THE METIS

A New Legal Remedy for Indigenous People

The Duty to Consult—A Second-Best Alternative

What Does the Daniels Decision Mean?

THE DUTY TO CONSULT

Provinces’ Have Every Right to Set Conditions on Pipelines

A Pipeline Too Far: How to Stop Kinder Morgan

The Inadequacy of Environmental Assessments

Environmental Assessments and the Duty to Consult

Is the Duty to Consult Clear as Mud?

The Duty to Consult—Ignore the Elephant

The Duty to Consult as an Ongoing Obligation

Breathing Life Back into the Duty to Consult

The Duty to Consult—the Groundhog Day Conundrum

Columbus’ Ghost: Past Infringements and the Duty to Consult

The Duty to Consult—A Roadblock to Direct Action

Good News for the Duty to Consult

Negotiate or Litigate?

The Duty to Consult—A Narrow Vision

How to Fulfill the Duty to Consult

TOWARDS DECOLONIZATION

Why Quebec but not Indigenous Appointments to the Supreme Court?

Canada’s Misguided Land Claims Policy

The Case for Denying Indigenous Rights

Colonialism’s Disciples: How Government Undermines Indigenous People

How the Canadian Legal System Fails Indigenous People

Indigenous Identity and Aboriginal Law: A Personal Journey

Download a free copy here: https://www.firstpeopleslaw.com/public-edu…/publications.php

In her search for community Mairy joined the First Unitarian Church of Toronto in the early nineties, thinking it was another liberal Christian denomination. The services were similar in format to those of her Presbyterian childhood. Slowly over the following months, she started to notice the differences but it was not until she attended the new members’ orientation a year later that she truly understood what UU was all about. There she learned about Starhawk and the Reclaiming tradition of paganism and found her spiritual home.

At Toronto First Mairy was very active in RE, the LGBTQ group, and Womynspirit. She served on the Committee on Ministry, the RE committee and as a Convenor. After moving away from Toronto, she was an active member of the Elora-Fergus Fellowship.

Mairy and her partner, Martha, moved to Vancouver in June of 2016 to be closer to grandkids. They were nervous about finding friends and communities here. They are grateful to this congregation for making the transition easier.

Mairy enjoys the many opportunities to dance with the Sacred Circle Dance groups. She appreciates the time spent with the kids in the RE program. She is delighted to join with others honouring the pagan holy days as well as maintaining and walking the labyrinths. She finds the sermons inspiring, and joins in the protests and other social justice and environmental activities as much as she can. Recently, she became a member of the Board. She appreciates getting her hands dirty in the gardens at UCV.

Another passion of Mairy`s is theatre. Several of her plays have been performed (one in Vancouver). Themes include: immigration, mental illness, forgiveness, gender. Her play, Let Me In, will have a reading as part of the Bodacious! Series on Saturday, Feb 24 at 7:30 pm at Presentation House, North Vancouver. Cast: Vivian Davidson, Killeen Delorme, Michelle Travis, Emily Beam

Admission by donation (suggested $5).