Meet some of our active members here. To see all of the posted testimonials, click here.

To read about some of our members who have been recognized as Unsung Heroes or Lifetime Members, click here.

In no particular order, I am an award-winning director and actor, co-founder and long-time Artistic Director of Vancouver’s own Ruby SlippersTheatre. I am the 2017 recipient of the prestigious Bra D’Or award, a national award annually presented by the Playwrights Guild of Canada, in recognition of years of championing works by women. I am a mom. A Masters Degree in Theatre holder. A Unitarian.

There is a paradigm shift going on in the arts, and indeed within society, where inclusivity and diversity are major values of social change and justice. These are Unitarian values. I have been one of many at the forefront of this movement of diversity and inclusivity in the arts..

And thus I invite you to Advance Theatre at the Fringe this year. Every weekday 1:30 pm by donation.

Read about Diane's involvement and Advance Theatre: New Works by Diverse Women

As a teenager in Vancouver in the 60’s, I babysat for a Unitarian family across the street so learned a bit about UCV and thought it would probably suit me better than the United Church my family was involved with. In 1988, recently separated with children ages 5 and 7, I consciously sought out a Unitarian community and have identified myself as a Unitarian ever since. I will be forever grateful for the children and youth programs that benefited my son and daughter as they were growing up including their truly beautiful and unique “Bridging Ceremonies.”

More about Lynn

 

Whenever I go to a Unitarian church or event, I feel “at home”. Unitarian Universalists are diverse, and congregations are diverse, but I find some things are common in most of them.They are one of the few places where different generations enjoy each other: from babies to centenarians.  We are a rainbow of ages. Since I am a life long Unitarian (I am also a Universalist, but too many syllables), I have experienced our religion from all the ages up to 72, so far.  (More about Karl).

I’ve been told that people join the Unitarian Universalist movement for one reason and stay for other reasons. That’s partly true for me, but the main reason I stay is the same reason I joined 20 years ago – UCV, (Xundaohui, 寻道会, Seekers of the Way), is a community and physical space that helps me focus on living by principles that I value in the company of others who share those values.

I first came to UCV to attend a memorial service for a friend who had led a too short and rather unorthodox life. I was deeply moved by how the lay chaplain honoured and celebrated that life without doctrinal overlay. After the service I picked up a pamphlet that stated the UU principles and sources. I liked everything about them and returned to the church on a subsequent Sunday morning where I was greeted by a personable and articulate minister and invited gently into a complex and elegant worship service—people in community honouring all lives and spirits. I was hooked.

(More about Keith)

 

I am from France and now in British Columbia, an Anglophone province with francophones in a minority.

How did I end up here? In 1974, love brought me here: my husband had a job in BC. Twenty-six years later, after 30 years of marriage, we divorced. Shortly after, I joined the Unitarian Church. I was following a group of my friends who were involved in the Paganism Committee. This is what brought me to UCV, but I soon discovered there was a lot more available. UCV catered to most of my interests—open spirituality, social justice, concern for the environment, refugee support, art, music, dance, literature and a dynamic children’s and youth program. And most important the pagan committee or earth spirit council.

Although my children were all away at university or working, I was already thinking of grandchildren. So I came in 2001. I truly found my spiritual home.

Now I know everyone leaves home eventually. I left the Catholic home before; then the existentialist/atheist home. Will I stay home here?

If I left for any reason, I know I would need to come back to visit and reconnect with all I’ve experienced here. For now, I have no thought of leaving.

When I jokingly made a new year's resolution to become spiritually developed and have matching towels, I had no idea where that would lead. This church was one of three religious groups I checked out back in 1989--and with all of its (and my) warts and all, this is what stuck. I joined in 1991 after "just browsing" for two years.

In 2017 Mary was awarded the Lifetime Member Award.

(More about Mary.)