Meet some of our active members here. To see all of the posted testimonials, click here.

To read about some of our members who have been recognized as Unsung Heroes or Lifetime Members, click here.

I’ve been told that people join the Unitarian (Universalist) movement for one reason and stay for other reasons. That’s partly true for me, but the main reason I stay is the same reason I joined 20 years ago – UCV, (Xundaohui, 寻道会, Seekers of the Way), is a community and physical space that helps me focus on living by principles that I value in the company of others who share those values.

I first came to UCV to attend a memorial service for a friend who had led a too short and rather unorthodox life. I was deeply moved by how the lay chaplain honoured and celebrated that life without doctrinal overlay. After the service I picked up a pamphlet that stated the UU principles and sources. I liked everything about them and returned to the church on a subsequent Sunday morning where I was greeted by a personable and articulate minister and invited gently into a complex and elegant worship service—people in community honouring all lives and spirits. I was hooked.

(More about Keith)

 

I'm an actor, writer, college student and life-long Unitarian. Originally from Victoria BC, the traditional territory of the Leqwungen Nation, I grew up in First Unitarian Church of Victoria.

After taking an extended break from service attendance and being awake on Sunday mornings, although not from my UU identity, I began attending services here in 2010, when I moved to Vancouver as a young adult. (More about Leonie)

 

Whenever I go to a Unitarian church or event, I feel “at home”. Unitarian Universalists are diverse, and congregations are diverse, but I find some things are common in most of them.They are one of the few places where different generations enjoy each other: from babies to centenarians.  We are a rainbow of ages. Since I am a life long Unitarian (I am also a Universalist, but too many syllables), I have experienced our religion from all the ages up to 72, so far.  (More about Karl).

I was first introduced to the UU church and faith by a dear World Federalist colleague and long-time Unitarian who thought, given my love for being curious, asking questions, meeting interesting people and being open to new ideas, that I would find a home here.
The first service by Rev. Epperson he talked about climate change and politics. Having been raised all over the world and having been exposed to many religions and faiths I had not found any of them to be nearly as insightful, compassionate, all-encompassing as the Unitarian one seemed to be.

Read the full testimonial.

 

As a teenager in Vancouver in the 60’s, I babysat for a Unitarian family across the street so learned a bit about UCV and thought it would probably suit me better than the United Church my family was involved with. In 1988, recently separated with children ages 5 and 7, I consciously sought out a Unitarian community and have identified myself as a Unitarian ever since. I will be forever grateful for the children and youth programs that benefited my son and daughter as they were growing up including their truly beautiful and unique “Bridging Ceremonies.”

More about Lynn

 

When I jokingly made a new year's resolution to become spiritually developed and have matching towels, I had no idea where that would lead. This church was one of three religious groups I checked out back in 1989--and with all of its (and my) warts and all, this is what stuck. I joined in 1991 after "just browsing" for two years.

In 2017 Mary was awarded the Lifetime Member Award.

(More about Mary.)