Category: Environment

Playlist : All My Relations


All My Relations, Religious Naturalism and The Heart of a Faith for the 21st Century


UCV Podcasts

All My Relations

Speakers

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Aline LaFlamme
Her name means the light (Aline) and the flame (LaFlamme.) She also carries the name Many Buffalo Running. Aline is a grandmother and Metis from Alberta. Among her many gifts she leads a drumming circle called Daughters of the Drum

Martha Saunders
joined UCV in the fall of 2018. She taught religious studies and women’s studies for many years at Concordia University, Montreal, and at the University of Toronto, specializing in religious and environmental ethics

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Rev. Dr. Steven Epperson
was parish minister of the Unitarian Church of Vancouver for 19 years, retiring in 2020. Prior to entering professional ministry, Steven worked as a university professor in the history of religions, and as a museum curator

1

All My Relations
by Aline LaFlamme
April 17, 2019


2

Living Within the Interdependent Web
by Martha Saunders
August 4, 2019


3

Religious Naturalism
by Rev. Steven Epperson
March 24, 2019


4

Religious Naturalism — Take Two
by Rev. Steven Epperson
April 14, 2019

Vancouver Unitarians Join Extinction Rebellion at Cambie Bridge Shut Down

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Above: We joined the die-in at the intersection of Broadway and Cambie, then marched to the middle of the Cambie bridge for the sit-in

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Above: Vancouver Unitarians Carry the Flame at the Cambie Bridge Sit-In

A group of Vancouver Unitarians, including Mairy Beam, Rob Dainow, and Vivian Davidson, joined several hundred protesters in the March 27, 2021 Extinction Rebellion march for old growth trees and climate justice.

“Logging old growth directly violates Extinction Rebellion’s demand to Act Now,” said Kelly Tatham, a volunteer with Extinction Rebellion.

We are all standing up for the climate – and for our ecosystems – whenever we can and in whatever ways we can. Every little bit counts.

Eulogy for Ancient Trees

Demand the BC government meet its promise to implement a new approach to forest management

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Above: Before and after the clearcut in the Caycuse watershed. The clearcut is part of a cutblock located in Tree Farm Licence 46, held by the Teal-Jones Group.
Photo Credit: All photos in this story are by TJ Watt

In May 2019, Andrea Inness from the Ancient Forest Alliance spoke at the First Sunday Forum. She talked about the critical importance of legislation to protect BC’s remaining ancient forests.

The Enviro Team followed up with a letter writing campaign urging the BC Forests Minister to work with First Nations to implement a science-based Old-Growth Protection Act.

Nearly two years later, we bring an update from the frontlines of BC’s ancient forests.

  1. In July 2019, the BC government appointed a two-person panel to lead an Old Growth Strategic Review.
  2. In November 2019 and April, 2020, photographer TJ Watt visited the Caycuse watershed near Cowichan Lake, in Ditidaht territory, to document the loss of a grove of ancient red cedars to clearcut logging.
  3. On Sept 11, 2020, the BC government announced a “new approach” to ancient forests and stated it would defer old-growth harvesting in “nine areas of the province totaling 352,739 hectares as a first step.”
  4. On March 11, 2021, three environmental NGOs issued a progress report stating, to date, the government has only deferred about 3,800 hectares — less than 1% of the most at-risk old-growth forests.
  5. Meanwhile, Teal-Jones Group is seeking a court injunction to end the seven-month blockade by activists in the Fairy Creek watershed on traditional Pacheedaht territory. Fairy Creek is one of the last intact old-growth valleys on southern Vancouver Island.

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Above: Before and after the clearcut in the Caycuse watershed

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Sandpiper SOS

Shorebirds and Port Expansion. Don’t miss this video on the Western Sandpiper.
Learn to love river slime

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Western Sandpiper | Photo Credit: Alan D. Wilson CC BY-SA 3.0

According to APE, the port expansion at Roberts Bank will see the loss of globally-significant wetlands and habitat for the Western Sandpiper and other migratory birds, shorebirds, waterfowl, salmon, herring, crabs and orca whales; degradation of the quality of life for Lower Mainland residents; and the industrialization of prime agricultural land.

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I am Atl’ka7tsem Howe Sound

Whales, and the Revolution They Inspired to Protect Átl’ka7tsem / Howe Sound

For your viewing enjoyment. A beautiful video by Bob Turner — documentary film maker and former mayor of Bowen Island.

The video was featured on the Action EveningWhales, and the Revolution They Inspired to Protect Átl’ka7tsem / Howe Sound.

Pipelines, Brunette River and ME/WE by Catherine Hembling

Pipelines, Brunette River and ME/WE…
I think there’s a song that goes something like that!

These past months along the Brunette have brought great resolve and activity to the lives of many activists, many of them seniors. I feel invigorated by my involvement in something so much bigger than I am. As well, I walk in beauty, at least once a week, along the Brunette as part of my “work”.

I am a member the Prayer Circle, in turn part of PPSTMX (Protect the Planet Stop TransMountain Expansion). There are legal fees to pay, there is soup to be delivered, there are people to meet!

We are publicly and peacefully defending the Brunette’s Salmon runs, riparian zones, trees, water quality, environment. As well, we actively support the courageous tree sit which has been going on since Dec. 21/20 with little Press coverage. By doing so we hope to increase the public’s resolve to speak out against this urban pipeline construction. We hold PM Trudeau to his assertion that there has to be community support for TMX.

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Finding Our Story Within EcoSpirituality

Roots and Wings
Finding Our Story Within
Eco-Spirituality

Presentation by Rev Lara Cowtan at the
UUE EcoSpirituality Conference in Prague,
September 15th, 2018
Čapek Hall, Anenská 5, Prague 1 (Old Town)

Ecology and Spirituality
A Vision for Unitarianism and Unitarian Universalism
in the 21st Century!

Our spiritual response to the environmental crisis can bring us to understand ourselves as part of the divine wholeness of the natural world, finding our self intertwined with the web of life in a way that enriches all life

Old City in Prague

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Ralph Waldo Emerson

Jake’s avatar and Neytiri

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Robin Wall Kimmerer

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David Suzuki

Playlist: Rethinking Reconciliation


UCV Podcasts on Unitarianism and Indigenous People

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A fundamental rethink is needed to save Canada’s reconciliation project from being an on-going massive failure. — Bruce McIvor

UCV Podcasts

Rethinking Reconciliation

* The Podcasts in this Playlist were sponsored by the Reconciliation Working Group (a sub-committee of the Social Justice Committee.) This illustrates how issues embraced by different Committees at UCV are interconnected. Certainly, reconciliation cannot be separated from land title, land protection and water protection.

Speakers

Bruce McIvor
is a proud Métis from the Red River in Manitoba. He holds a law degree, a doctorate in Aboriginal and environmental history, is a Fulbright Scholar and adjunct professor at the UBC Allard School of Law

Cole Harris
is a Professor Emeritus at the University of British Columbia and an internationally renowned historical geographer. His academic field is colonialism and the native land question in British Columbia, and patterns of early Canadian settlement

Aline LaFlamme
Her name means the light (Aline) and the flame (LaFlamme.) She also carries the name Many Buffalo Running. Aline is a grandmother and Metis from Alberta. Among her many gifts she leads a drumming circle called Daughters of the Drum

Nan Gregory
is a professional storyteller, artist and award-winning author. Born in Boston Massachusetts, she grew up in Victoria British Columbia, and now makes her home in Vancouver. Nan pleaded guilty to criminal contempt for protesting TMX

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Bruce McIvor

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Aline LaFlamme

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Nan Gregory

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Cole Harris


Buy Nothing Groups are now all over Vancouver

Buy Nothing Groups are now in every neighbourhood in Vancouver.

And many areas beyond the city as well.

They’ve been growing both in membership and number of groups since March 2020, many doubling in size in six months from the start of the pandemic.

Cayla introduced Mary to Buy Nothing Project in early 2019, after meeting at the womens’ gathering.
Both are now administrators on their neighbourhood Buy Nothing Groups – Marpole and Kitsilano North East respectively.
These are facebook groups where people give stuff away and ask for what they need. And, importantly, express their gratitude. The third kind of post is what keeps the community building part in the forefront.

In 2019, CityTV visited a Buy Nothing “free store” that Mary coordinated. Watch the video here:

Kitsilano is the largest group in Vancouver and has recently helped to mentor volunteers and promote new groups in West Point Grey and Dunbar/Kerrisdale.

Do you want to declutter without contributing to the landfill?

If you’ve every frequented (or have ever fantasized about) a “free store” – here’s a way to try it out.

Find a group in BC by going to http://tinyurl.com/bnpmapbc

A Victory in the Discovery Islands for Wild Salmon

Contact the Enviro Team | Join the Enviro Email Group

a victory for wild salmon: photo drummers form the Wild Salmon Defenders Alliance

Above: Drummers lead by Eddie Gardner from the Wild Salmon Defenders Alliance joined with the UCV Wild Salmon Action Team to engage in street theatre outside the offices of the DFO in downtown Vancouver. They were part of a broader province-wide coalition, this September, calling for the end to fish farms in the Discovery Islands.

A victory for wild salmon. Trudeau government to phase out fish farms in the Discovery Islands by June 2022

On December 17, 2020, the UCV Wild Salmon Action Team (WSAT) celebrated the federal government’s announcement of their decision to remove fish farms from the Discovery Islands.

The Discovery Islands channels is an area known to be a bottleneck area for migrating wild salmon and one of the worst places to put open-net pen salmon farms with their increasingly poor control over lice infestations and virus infections. The Cohen commission had been set up in 2012 when the Fraser River sockeye return fell to 3 million. In 2020 that number plummeted to less than 300,000 which resulted in unprecedented solidarity from over 100 First Nations, sport and commercial fishermen, tourism operators, and several environmental organizations calling for the total removal of the Discovery Island fish farms. On December 17, the government agreed.

The WSAT can claim a small part of that decision, perhaps by being an annoying sliver in the feet of the decision makers, (WSAT had been meeting and petitioning MPs and MLAs for months,) or by adding our bodies and loonies to support other wild salmon protection groups. The day before the December announcement, WSAT met with MP Terry Beech, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, and even though they knew the decision had already been made, added their voice to the chorus of demands for change. As well, they submitted information for the 2021 consultation meetings listing their demands that the remaining 100+ fish farms be taken out of all West Coast waters and be put on land, that scientists with research that disagreed with Industry publications be heard, and that Indigenous groups from the top of Vancouver Island to the headwaters of the Fraser River lead the planning and management of the wild salmon stocks.

WSAT is mulling over future actions which include public education, divestment campaigns, and working with Indigenous and local groups.

When fish farms are removed we find healthy juvenile salmon and a chance for wild salmon to rebound.

In April 2020, biologist Alexandra Morton found juvenile salmon free of sea lice leaving the Broughton Archipelago less than a year after just two fish farms in the area were removed by First Nations.

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