Category: Learning

Learning/educational workshops for adults or intergenerational. Adult Religious Education.

Education, Resiliency, and Healing

Vancouver Unitarians’ Koerner Foundation Funds Committee is pleased to announce that the Board has approved a grant for the Alderwood Family Development Centre for a project that provides the opportunity for education, resiliency and healing – by offering child and family drum making and drumming lessons. The drum is a symbol of culture, of togetherness and is a tool to honour unique and individual voices of children and families.

About the Centre

The Alderwood Family Development Centre serves the most complex and vulnerable children and families in Vancouver – these are children for whom there is no alternative schooling. The Centre provides a one year intensive day treatment program for children ages 6 to 12. It is family-centred and services and supports are collaborative, culturally sensitive, individualized and flexible.
 
The donation will be funded from annual grants given to UCV by the Vancouver Foundation from their Robert & Anna Koerner Foundation Community Fund.

UCV community links and a virtual literature stall

UCV community links keep us connected in these otherwise isolating times. Here is a short list of these links:

https://ucv.im/live … Livestream link for Sunday church services (active at 10:55am every Sunday).
https://ucv.im/oos … An online version of the current Order of Service
https://ucv.im/coffee … Virtual coffee hour – every Sunday immediately following the service
https://ucv.im/give … How to donate from anywhere
https://ucv.im/events … The most frequently updated list of UCV events
https://ucv.im/sermons … A text-based archive of sermons – a virtual literature stall
https://ucv.im/core … An archive of core documents: board minutes, annual reports, …

For these UCV links and more, click here to go to the list at https://ucv.im/ucvlinks-more.

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Please note a particular item in the list: a link to a list of sermons – a virtual literature stall (lit stall).

After the livestreamed service at ucv.im/live you can go to the list of sermons at ucv.im/sermons to view or download a copy of the prepared text for the sermon if the speaker already provided one.

 


The above is a lit stall post first published on June 9, 2020. The featured image shows the cover of the Order of Service for the preceding Sunday, when a short list of UCV community links like the one above was included. The date now displayed with this post is the date of its latest material update.

The post at ucv.im/ucvlinks is this post. You also can find this post at vancouverunitarians.ca/links.

Or search this website for “links” – with or without quotes – and see this post as the top result.

In the bulleted list below are the three latest posts tagged as lit stall posts.

If you haven’t read it already, please see the post about lit stall posts for more information.

Children and Youth RE Fall Update

Our Youth are very busy this year, many of you will have heard directly from them this past Sunday. This amazing, resilient, group of young people continue to meet for two hours each Sunday and run a Dungeons and Dragons campaign on Wednesday nights.

Children and Youth RE Fall Update

by Kiersten E. Moore


(more…)

Tracking down a past sermon

Are people talking about a great sermon you missed? Help is at hand. Read on.

The prepared texts of selected sermons are stored on the UCV website. Links to those before 2018 are here. Links to more recent ones are included in descriptions of past services.

If the website doesn’t have the one you want – or if it isn’t easy to find out if it does – speak to whoever is staffing the literature stall (the lit stall) in Hewett Centre after the service.

(Not while the coronavirus is a thing, obviously, so please email me instead.) note added 2020-04-02

An archive of digital versions backs up all print copies of prepared texts of sermons the lit stall distributes. Lit stall staff can help you track down a back copy even if it’s out of print.

If you’d like to know more about any of this, please email me.


The above is a lit stall post. In the bulleted list below are the three latest posts with that tag.

If you haven’t read it already, please see the post about lit stall posts for more information.

You can do it – making salsa with Raul and Isabeau

You Can do it–We Can Help

You can do it - Members share their enthusiasm and expertise
You can do it – Members share their enthusiasm and expertise

Raúl is originally from Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. He has been living in Vancouver for over 30 years and continues to share his love of Mexican food with family and friends. Isabeau is Raúl’s spouse and the happy beneficiary of Raúl’s love of cooking.
Raúl and Isabeau live in Vancouver with their two teenagers and their always-relaxed cat.

Join Raúl and Isabeau to learn how to make easy Mexican salsa.  No cooking experience necessary!

Raúl will prepare the salsa live so you can follow along (and then enjoy your masterpiece for lunch!).

To make enough salsa for two people, please have the following ingredients at the session:

  • 2 tomatoes
  • 1/2 cucumber (peel it ahead of time)
  • 1/4 small onion (white or purple)
  • 1 bunch cilantro (you will only need 1/4)
  • 1 lime
  • 1/2 Jalapeno pepper OR Serrano pepper
  • pinch salt
  • pinch black pepper

You will need a cutting board, sharp knife, and little bowl in which to put your salsa.

Kids and youth very welcome to join us – their adults will be responsible for use of sharp knives.

A Gift for Steven

To mark this, his final year as minister of the Unitarian Church of Vancouver, members of the congregation have created a book for Steven Epperson.  It contains a selection of sermons from the more than 300 Steven has delivered over his 17 years at UCV.  When one reads the book one quickly realizes it is as much a gift to us as it is to Steven.  Ah, but there’s even more to it.  Think of that loved-one or friend who asked you what Unitarian Universalism was all about.  Perhaps you gave them our famous ‘bookmark’.  Well “Life and Transcendence” is the book for the bookmark.

The cost of a copy is $20.00 and it is available from the library stall in Hewett Hall.  The proceeds go to UCV.

 

 

If you are unable to pick one up from the library, you can order your copy by clicking here.

The cost of ordering a copy is $30.00 since it includes a shipping fee.

Cakes for the Queen of Heaven – Feminist “Thealogy” curriculum starts Feb 6

Laurie Anderson and Paula Stromberg will co-facilitate In Ancient Times (Volume I of the Cakes for the Queen of Heaven program) starting on February 6, 2020, for five weeks on Thursday evenings 7 – 9 pm in the Fireside Room at the Vancouver Unitarian Centre

The course is limited to a maximum of 12 women. Pre-registration is required. http://tiny.cc/ucv-cakes

More information about the program can be found here:

https://www.cakesforthequeenofheaven.org/

If these dates don’t work for you, but you’d like to be on a wait list for any future offerings, please sign up here: https://vancouver.breezechms.com/form/cakesforthequeenofheaven

CUUWA (Canadian U*U Women’s Association) * may also offer this popular curriculum by Zoom. Stay tuned!

Here’s some information from the UUWF (Unitarian Universalist Women’s Federation)

Cakes resources can now be downloaded

The UU Women and Religion Store has had many requests to make the digital resources for the classic curriculum, Cakes for the Queen of Heaven, available as downloadable files instead of on a CD shipped with the books. We’re happy to announce they’ve made that happen! Now the spiral-bound curriculum books will be shipped with a link and password to access the files. If you have already purchased the curriculum and would like access, please email store@uuwr.org.

Cost of the curriculum is $75 US. UCV has the curriculum for any member to borrow. Thank you to North Shore Unitarians for lending two copies to us as well

From the Cakes website:

IN ANCIENT TIMES

This five-session Volume I of the popular adult religious education curriculum includes an introductory section featuring author Shirley’s Ranck’s “Statement of Feminist Thealogy,” Elinor Artman’s “Brief Herstory of Cakes,” and Nancy Vedder-Shults, “Baking Cakes for the Queen of Heaven.”

The themes of the Session Plans are: The Sacred Female, In the Name of the Mother and the Daughter, Womanpower, The First Turning-From Goddess to God, and Reclaiming Women’s Heritage of Peace. The resource section includes supplementary essays by a number of important authors, a listing of highly recommended materials, and the sheet music of songs by Carole Eagleheart and Ann Forfreedom for use with the curriculum. The curriculum also includes a CD-ROM with five Visual Programs to accompany the sessions, plus resource material for easy distribution to participants.

ON THE THRESHOLD

In the six-session continuation of the course, Volume II, we will continue our journey into the past to reclaim the stories of powerful women to be found in ancient Judaism and in early Christianity. We will also look at the global silencing and brutalization of women that accompanied the rise of patriarchal religion and society. Finally we will celebrate the exciting new world-view and thealogy that has emerged in our time, and explore the personal and social changes that may be suggested by that new world-view and thealogy. We will continue the complex process of telling a new story.
In addition, you may order Carole Etzler Eagleheart’s CD “She Calls to Us,” which contains many of the songs in the curriculum. Sound samples are available on her MUSIC page.

* To join CUUWA email group, please contact: cuuwa.cuc@gmail.com

Visit the CUUWA Facebook page. It is public so there is no need to be a Facebook user. Feel free to post articles of interest to all.

What’s in a Name? Next forum January 19

The What Do We Call Ourselves task force (WDWCO) was created by the Board in 2018 to examine whether we should change our name from the Unitarian Church of Vancouver to a name without “church.” To carry out its mission, WDWCO would like to provide ways for all members and friends (adherents) of UCV to hear, understand, and contribute to the discussions around what name best suits our congregation. Although as UCV members, we might differ on the name question, we believe we share similar values and goals for our beloved community. We are confident that we can come to shared understanding and a path forward.

We offer the following viewpoints (heard during informal discussions among some UCV members) as a starting point for discussion. If your viewpoint isn’t represented here, we’d like to know what it is. We want input and will be seeking it at the Forum on January 19th.

I want to retain our current name because:
Our name Unitarian Church of Vancouverhonours our 500-year history as a Church. For me, the UnitarianChurchof today has an expanded meaning that is inclusive of all ethical beliefs. It demonstrates how a Church can be a progressive religious community.

The name “Church” speaks to our spiritual roots and provides a sense of continuity and comfort. Some of us may have left the church of our upbringing, but we have not severed our connection with spirituality.

The name Unitarian Churchhas gravitas and promotes respect. Having originated as a branch of Christianity, we are identified as a religious community and we belong at the table of multi-faith gatherings. As well, our identity as a Church invites media inquiries seeking “religious perspectives” on pressing moral issues.

The Unitarian Church has led and continues to lead progressive religious change. Such progress can be inspiring to other religious communities.

I want to change our name because:
I am uncomfortable with the word Church, finding it restrictive as a name for our spiritual home and community. A church is by definition a Christianentity, which is not a spiritual fit with those members and friends who do not identify as Christian. “Church” discourages many potential attendees who have negative associations with Christian denominations, along with those whose heritage is in non-Christian cultures, those who identify as Pagans or secular Humanists, and those who resist any labelling of their views. And a more welcoming name could appeal to those who describe themselves as “spiritual but not religious” , individuals who may be seeking an inclusive spiritual community free of dogma.

I believe that with an alternative name we will remain an influential member of multifaith communities. For example, one of the largest Unitarian communities in Canada, The First Unitarian Congregation of Ottawa, (no “Church” in their name), is well-respected in the National Capital Region, and has good relations with near and far-flung Christian and non-Christian faith communities alike.

34 of the 47 Unitarian congregations in Canada call themselves something other than a Church.

I am undecided because:
I haven’t thought much about this and I don’t have enough information. I look forward to participating in our community’s thoughtful consideration and discussion of all the input. I want to understand the beliefs and opinions of others. I hope I’ll then be better able to make a decision.

I will support whatever decision is made:
I trust our community will thoughtfully consider all input and make the best decision for the greater good.

I am reluctant to get involved…
To the reluctant, we encourage you to consider that in our community, all views count. We invite your careful listening and input as the discussions proceed. We want an environment where you feel comfortable to contribute your voice.

We strive to make ourdecision process inclusive, caring, informed, and democratic. What we choose to call ourselves is our identity.It matters.

Please share your views, come to the Forum on January 19th. Questions in the meantime?
Email us at: sresels@gmail.com