Topic: Our Unitarian Community

Courage

It’s not listed in our Unitarian Seven Principles or among the Sources of our living tradition: Courage. Ancient cultures esteemed it as a principal virtue. Does it have a place in our lives and world today? If so, how and why?
This is First Sunday, all-congregation worship service. Prepare for some audience participation.

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UN Sunday and Gibbard Award

Join us for a Celebration of UN Sunday and the opportunity to meet and hear from this year’s UN Gibbard Award winner. “The goal of world community with peace, liberty and justice for all”. We still affirm this principle and extend our support for the vision and effective work of the UN.
The Chalice Choir sings

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Abundance and Thanksgiving

This all-congregation Thanksgiving Sunday celebrates abundance, the having enough, and more, of good things in our lives. Abundance doesn’t mean everything’s perfect. It’s more a recognition that, to quote Wendell Berry, “what we need is here.” It means gratitude for abundance in our world, our community, from family to friends to a congregation, as well as abundance in justice making.
The Chalice Choir sings

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Peak Bull

It’s no secret that we’re contending with a world awash in bullying, post-truth, and alternative facts. Unitarians are committed by covenant to a “free and responsible search for truth and meaning.”

We’ll look at what’s being called the new war on truth and consider how we could and should fight back

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Print Sermon

2018-09-23 Peak Bull (82.9 KiB)

Listen:

2018-09-23-Peak_Bull.mp3

Am I Welcome Here, Just as I Am?

Canadian Unitarians and Universalists strive to be radically inclusive of people with various social identities. Please join me to reflect on our own social identities and consider the challenges we face to be truly welcoming of others who are similar and different than we are.

Rev. Meg Roberts will be starting her seventh year as quarter-time consulting minister with the Comox Valley Unitarian Fellowship. She lives here in Vancouver, is a member of this congregation, and also does a community ministry using the arts in spiritual exploration. As part of that work last winter, she was in the BC and Alberta tour of Theatre for Living’s forum play šxʷʔamət (home) which explored what true and honourable reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Canadians looks like.

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Sermon Text

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Audio

2018-08-26-Am_I_Welcome_Here_As_I_Am.mp3

Finding My Spiritual Path

Describing Unitarian religion often focuses on what it isn’t. For me, what makes us religious is our gentle encouragement of a variety of collective and personal “spiritual” practices, broadly conceived. I’ll describe some of mine, and how I grew into them. Perhaps our paths will cross.

Karl Perrin is a life long Unitarian. He learned activism at Sunday school in Detroit, and has been an environmental activist since 1993. Currently he is helping to stop the second dilbit pipeline to Burnaby. In 2012, he wrote an anti-pipeline divestment resolution passed by a wide majority at UCV.

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Sermon Text

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Listen

2018-08-05-Karl_Perrin-Finding_My_Spiritual_Path.mp3

First and Seventh: A Non-neurotypical Experience of Interdependence and Its Call to Love and Justice

I always knew I was a Unitarian, but I didn’t know I had ADHD for 29 years of my life. When I was diagnosed, suddenly a lifetime of nameless frustrations made sense. Not only wasn’t I somehow broken, but I was in no way alone in my experiences. With this new understanding of why my square peg could never be jammed into the round hole it was given, and the memory of a lifetime of isolation, the 2017 CUC vision of a world in which our interdependence calls us to love and justice speaks to me profoundly. Let me tell you why.

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The Spirit Flag

Most of us are comfortable thinking about our physical bodies, the ones made so substantially out of electron clouds, protons, space, and perhaps dark energy. We’re often less comfortable thinking about our mysterious minds – what they are, where they’re located, and the self which may be part of the mind.

Perhaps most mysterious of all is something we call spirit. Lying in hospital recently, recovering from open heart surgery, I started thinking about these things, and about the spiritual impulse that brings many people to the Unitarian Universalist movement. As I lay there, the idea of a Spirit Flag kept rising in my mind. This is an account of my Spirit Flag.

And a brief comment about Canada Day.

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Listen to the Podcast

 

Coming of Age Bridging and Fathers’ Day

How does the universe work? How should we treat one another? What does it mean to create real change?

These are some of the questions our 11 to 14-year olds have been thinking about in their Coming of Age group this year. They will share what they’ve learned about Unitarianism, social justice, and their own religious beliefs before bridging into youth group.

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Our Living Tradition or: What Good is a Congregation?

On this First Sunday all-congregation worship, we celebrate the spirit and fact of voluntary service in our congregation and beyond. We’ll look at the crucial role “civil society,” like religion, performs in helping to encourage the integrity of our societies and our individual rights and freedoms.

Given that we’ll all be together, young and old, hopefully, we’ll have some fun in the process.

The Chalice Choir sings.

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Order of Service