Category: social justice

Tamiko Suzuki – living with less stuff

Tamiko is Outreach Coordinator for our very active Environment team. Recently her laneway home was featured on the show Living Big in a Tiny Home with the title “Wabi-Sabi Modern Japanese Inspired Small Home.”

Watch here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bdEsVoqbD5s

Read more about Tamiko and her involvement with the Unitarians below.

As the daughter of two non-religious scientists, I was never interested in church. As a university student in Montreal I checked out the Unitarians but decided the Sunday services got in the way of skiing, hiking or just sleeping in.  Similarly, once I had a family, Sundays were for the kids’ hockey and soccer games.It wasn’t until five years ago, my kids grown up and gone, when my husband passed away suddenly, that I found a need to find a spiritual community.

I showed up at the North Shore Unitarian church and would sit in the back then slink home after the sermon. I felt I had nothing in common with all those white-haired West Van congregants until one day I joined some church elders at lunch after the service. We were sitting quietly enjoying the soup, when one grey haired lady suddenly slammed her fist on the table and said, “Can you believe what Stephen Harper just did?”  That started a rousing discussion about what was wrong with the latest bill in Ottawa. I sat up and knew right then that I had found my church!

A year later, I moved from North Van to Vancouver and purely because I didn’t want to spend  time commuting, joined UCV. I enjoyed the sermons and the music and this time I was more proactive. I started looking for a group to meet people and be able to help out. I found the Environment Team!

More about Tamiko Suzuki

 

Bruce McIvor

Bruce McIvor attends UCV with his family.

Dr. Bruce McIvor, Lawyer and Historian, Principal, First Peoples Law Corporation. Dr. Bruce McIvor is principal of First Peoples Law Corporation, a law firm dedicated to defending and advancing Aboriginal title, Aboriginal rights and Treaty rights. His work includes both litigation and negotiation on behalf of Indigenous Peoples across Canada. Bruce is dedicated to public education. He recently published the third edition of his collection of essays entitled First Peoples Law: Essays in Canadian Law and Decolonization. He is also an Adjunct Professor at the University of British Columbia’s Allard School of Law where he teaches the constitutional law of Aboriginal and Treaty rights. Bruce is a proud Métis from the Red River in Manitoba. He holds a law degree, a Ph.D. in Aboriginal and environmental history and is a Fulbright Scholar. Bruce, a member of the bar in British Columbia and Ontario, is recognized nationally and internationally as a leading practitioner of Aboriginal law in Canada.

First Peoples Law: Essays on Canadian Law and Decolonization, Bruce’s collection of essays, can be
downloaded for free from our website. Bruce also regularly holds free workshops for Indigenous people
throughout Canada on current issues in Aboriginal law.
Bruce is recognized nationally and internationally as a leading practitioner of Aboriginal law in Canada. He is a proud Métis from the Red River in Manitoba. Bruce holds a law degree, a Ph.D. in Aboriginal and environmental history, and is a Fulbright Scholar.

Scroll down to download his book of essays on First Peoples Law.

Here’s what his website says:

For me, advocacy is bred in the bone.

My ancestors experienced the disloyalty of the French and British, the Acadian Explusion, the conquest of New France, the dispossession at Red River and government’s refusal to honour the numbered Treaties.

I was focused on working for social justice through an academic career in history until I began working in the law with Louise Mandell, Q.C. (Mandell Pinder) and Stuart Rush, Q.C. (Rush Crane Guenther) on what I expected to be a temporary basis. That was over 15 years ago. Louise and Stuart introduced me to a world of principled, high quality legal advocacy that led me back to university for a law degree.

First Peoples Law combines my passions for law, history and social justice. Most importantly, it allows me to work with other committed professionals in supporting Indigenous Peoples’ ongoing struggle for respect and justice.

Email Bruce

Bruce’s Linkedin profile

Download Bruce’s Bio & CV

Click here to download your free pdf copy, order a paperback copy or do both: https://www.firstpeopleslaw.com/public-edu…/publications.php

We have a limited number of free paperback copies available for non-profit Indigenous organizations in Canada available for the cost of shipping–email us for details enquire@firstpeopleslaw.com

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ABORIGINAL TITLE

The Age of Recognition: The Significance of the Tsilhqot’in Decision

The Downside of the Tsilhqot’in Decision

TREATIES

Is Canada No Longer Responsible for Historical Treaties?

Provinces Burdened with Responsibility for Fulfilling Treaty Promises

What Tsilhqot’in and Grassy Narrows Mean for Treaty First Nations

The Piecemeal Infringement of Treaty Rights

THE METIS

A New Legal Remedy for Indigenous People

The Duty to Consult—A Second-Best Alternative

What Does the Daniels Decision Mean?

THE DUTY TO CONSULT

Provinces’ Have Every Right to Set Conditions on Pipelines

A Pipeline Too Far: How to Stop Kinder Morgan

The Inadequacy of Environmental Assessments

Environmental Assessments and the Duty to Consult

Is the Duty to Consult Clear as Mud?

The Duty to Consult—Ignore the Elephant

The Duty to Consult as an Ongoing Obligation

Breathing Life Back into the Duty to Consult

The Duty to Consult—the Groundhog Day Conundrum

Columbus’ Ghost: Past Infringements and the Duty to Consult

The Duty to Consult—A Roadblock to Direct Action

Good News for the Duty to Consult

Negotiate or Litigate?

The Duty to Consult—A Narrow Vision

How to Fulfill the Duty to Consult

TOWARDS DECOLONIZATION

Why Quebec but not Indigenous Appointments to the Supreme Court?

Canada’s Misguided Land Claims Policy

The Case for Denying Indigenous Rights

Colonialism’s Disciples: How Government Undermines Indigenous People

How the Canadian Legal System Fails Indigenous People

Indigenous Identity and Aboriginal Law: A Personal Journey

Download a free copy here: https://www.firstpeopleslaw.com/public-edu…/publications.php

Hanno Pinder

I became a Unitarian in 1962 in Sarnia, Ontario, then, upon arriving in Vancouver, joined UCV before the move to our present location.

UCV is my spiritual home; our principles and sources seem to fit with the conclusions I have drawn from living a long life. Especially UCVers share my concerns and fears about the present climate catastrophe.I like to think that we as a group can accomplish much more than I could do alone.

Lynn Armstrong

As a teenager in Vancouver in the 60’s, I babysat for a Unitarian family across the street so learned a bit about UCV and thought it would probably suit me better than the United Church my family was involved with. Read the full testimonial.