Statement on the 8th Principle by UCV Board President Diane Brown

Dear Unitarians,

Leadership does not mean “objectivity” or not taking a stance; leadership means defining yourself within the values of the organization and sharing that perspective and why you believe it. It also means listening. I am, as President, committed to doing both.

Full disclosure; I believe in the proposed 8th Principle and I am not going to pretend otherwise.

I know there is concern out there about recent events at the CUC. I would just like to add that my work on the UCV Board is to move us forward in a way that is truly inclusive and progressive, that furthers and deepens our stated collective vision.

That means we will be encouraging dialogue within our congregation, hosting an 8th Principle Forum, requesting everyone read the Dismantling Racism Study Group report and it’s recommendations which are attached below and on the website, and dedicating a service to the 8th Principle. In this way, more people can fully participate in discussion and understanding of the 8th Principle as a crucial next step.

The lack of inclusion of more voices, and the technicality that brought about the demise of this recent attempt to adopt the 8th Principle, will not exist, and we will all be able to walk forward together.

Moreover, we at UCV do not have to wait for the CUC to adopt the 8th Principle. After substantive discussion, we ourselves can put it to a vote, hopefully providing vision and leadership to our sister congregations.

Finally, Rev Lara shared some history with me that I would like to share with you all now.

There is some very interesting history around how the existing 7 principles were affirmed.  There were only going to be 6 of them, as people felt that interdependence was implicit in them, but others felt it necessary to explicitly name our responsibility and connection to the planet and its inhabitants. Now the 7th principle is a covenant to action for the environment and all non-humans on our Blue Boat Home.

The proposed 8th principle may seem to be implicit in the wording of the other 7, but recent studies https://cuc.ca/dismantling-racism-study-group/ and decades of experience have proven otherwise, so the people who are most impacted are asking to have it spelled out.

We Unitarians dream of a future where all of the principles we affirm to promote no longer need to be written, because they are simply lived. But we are not there yet.

In active faith and hope,

Diane Brown

UCV Board President

CUC National Voice Statement, February 2020

The recent RCMP raids of Wet’suwet’en land defenders in northwestern British Columbia has provoked widespread rallies, blockades and protests, world-wide media coverage, public statements by First Nations, politicians, industry, labour, and the public.  In view of these developments, we think it timely and important to restate the initial position taken by the Canadian Unitarian Council (CUC) on January 10, 2019:

CUC Pledges Solidarity with ​Wet’suwet’en

The Canadian Unitarian Council has joined thousands of organizations and individuals pledging solidarity with the ​Wet’suwet’en​ Hereditary Chiefs, who are blocking the development of a Coastal GasLink pipeline on their traditional territories in northwestern British Columbia:

  1. WE COMMEND the courage and vision of the Wet’suwet’en Hereditary Chiefs and their community of activists.
  2. WE ARE WATCHING across the province, country and internationally.
  3. WE DENOUNCE any attempt by Coastal GasLink Pipeline, the federal government, provincial government or RCMP to interfere in the rights of the Wet’suwet’en to occupy, manage or maintain their lands.
  4. WE URGE that any and all actions taken by the federal and provincial government, industry, and policing agencies must be consistent with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and Anuk Nu’at’en (Wet’suwet’en laws) and collective Title.
  5. WE PLEDGE support to the frontline land defenders and affirm the collective hereditary governance of the Wet’suwet’en who are enforcing Wet’suwet’en laws on their unceded lands.

Obviously, the situation has continued to evolve since last year. We recognise this is a complex matter and many of us bring strong opinions and passionate voices to the conversation—given our Unitarian Universalist principles and history, that is how it should be. We recognise, as well, quoting the Afro-American abolitionist Frederick Douglass, that “if there is no struggle, there is no progress” for “power concedes nothing without a demand.”

While we reaffirm the January 10, 2019 CUC Statement pledging solidarity with Wet’suwet’en, we urge Canadian Unitarian Universalists to reflect on how we live our faith and convictions when interests and constituencies are polarized.  We urge each other to live our principles.  May our actions be guided by respect for each other’s dignity, by compassion and empathy, by the voice of conscience and reason, by a desire for justice and equity, and by a deep respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part.

We urge Canadian Unitarian Universalists to read and become familiar with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples—our nation is a signatory to this Declaration; many of its articles clarify and promote the work of reconciliation and de-colonialisation which we dare hope is still alive in Canada today and will be for generations to come.


Vision

Our Vision

Because we envision a more compassionate world, we seek to deepen our spiritual and religious lives, grow and enrich our congregation, and advocate for love and justice.

Living Our Vision

As Unitarians, we are dedicated to spiritual growth, social justice, and reverence for nature and all life.
We embody these values through worship, ethical action, artistic expression, and religious education for all ages that aim to connect hearts, heads, and hands. Our congregation welcomes all ages, orientations, abilities, and identities in our joyous search for meaning.

We are a member of the Canadian Unitarian Council and affirm and promote the principles and sources.

Visioning Process website

With the ongoing help of our fellow UCV’ers, the Vision Task Force engaged in crafting a new Vision and Living Our Vision statement for UCV. A Visioning Process website was created to fully explain this process. Please click here for more information.

Living Our Vision Now

What would a visionary congregation look like and what steps do we take to achieve it?

Drawing from the new Vision statements of our congregation and the Canadian Unitarian Council, we’ll explore how we can deepen our spiritual lives, grow and enrich our congregation, and advocate for love and justice.

Order of Service: 

2017-09-17-Living Our Vision Now
2017-09-17-Living Our Vision Now
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2017-09-17-Living_Our_Vision_Now.mp3

 

Embracing Possibility – In the Interim

“Nourish beginnings, let us nourish beginnings.

Not all things are blessed,

but the seeds of all things are blessed.

The blessing is in the seed.”

Muriel Rukeyser, 1913 – 1980

 

Embracing Possibility – this is our Soul Matters theme for the month of September, which is perfectly fitting as we anticipate returning to the beautiful UCV Sanctuary with upgraded sound and lighting equipment along with refinished floors and brand new chairs, offering countless possibilities for gathering in new ways. 

Embracing possibility is also the way we enter this second year of transitional ministry together.

This transition period of three years in-between settled ministers is a special opportunity for UCV to rediscover itself and plan for the next chapter of its future.  This is a pivotal and exciting period of exploration, reflection, and preparation for the church to look at its entire system through the lens of the five developmental/ transitional tasks, which are:

  1. History – Reviewing how the Congregation has been shaped and formed; encouraging and hearing all of the stories about the Congregation’s past, as the foundation upon with the present rests; and embracing the rich variety that makes up the Congregation.
  2. Mission & Identity – recognizing its unique identity and its strengths, needs, and challenges; Defining and redefining sense of purpose and direction; clarifying the faith community’s identity and core values; working to develop, update, and revitalize mission and vision statements; and reviewing strategic and tactical plans including stewardship and the financial health of the congregation
  3. Leadership – clarifying the appropriate leadership roles of minister(s), church staff, and lay leaders and navigating the shifts in leadership that may accompany times of transition; Reviewing the membership needs and its ways of organizing and developing new and effective leadership; providing opportunity for individuals and the Congregational organization to examine the types of leadership needed for new leaders to emerge, and for seasoned leaders to recommit or to refocus their gifts.
  4. Connections – making appropriate use of CUC, UUA, and other outside resources; Discovering and revitalizing all the association, interfaith, and community relationships a congregation builds outside of itself; and re-assessing old links and considering new ones.
  5. Future – Developing congregational and pastoral profiles that position the congregation for its next ministry, including a healthy and honest assessment of the other focus points so that the congregation can turn its energy toward proactive decision-making for the future.

Embracing possibilities means being open to new ways of thinking and doing things, to letting go of old ways and patterns. This is especially important as we engage in conversations about the proposed 8th Principle to move forward with our commitment to dismantling racism and colonialist culture in our UU institutions and as we go deeper into the hard work of anti-racism within ourselves as individuals. Culture change is hard and sometimes painful work. We are blessed to be in community with one another in these complex times.  Let us be aware of how our words and actions may impact others and remember that we are all one family, one body, so please be gentle and kind with one another. 

UCV has adopted a new organizational design that streamlines the work of the congregation. Embracing and creating possibilities for new leadership to emerge bringing fresh ideas and energy while celebrating and sustaining the foundations  built by many generations of dedicated members. This is an exciting time to be here at UCV. 

Change is inevitable, and it is so often met with resistance, which can manifest in different ways. Resistance is usually about fear of the unknown, of letting go of what is familiar and taking a risk. Something must be lost so that something new can happen. The pain of loss is real and part of our ongoing human experience. The joy of new beginnings is also real, so let us celebrate the start of this program year together as a community by embracing possibilities to shape UCV’s future for coming generations. 

From the CUC (Canadian Unitarian Council) website:

Seven principles guide our choices. Six sources nourish our spirits.

Five aspirations help us grow.

As Canadian Unitarian Universalists, we aspire to be:

Deeply Connected: We strive to foster healthy relationships amongst and within UU communities, with the broader world and with all life.

Radically Inclusive: We strive to create hospitable, diverse, multi-generational communities.

Actively Engaged: We strive to work joyfully for a just and compassionate society, experimenting with new forms of community.

Theologically Alive: We seek to be ever-evolving in our understanding, open to new knowledge.

Spiritually Grounded: We seek transformation through personal spiritual experiences and shared ritual

 

Friends, may we grow together towards these Five Aspirations, embracing the possibilities to nourish our spirits and heal our world. 

 

Blessings, 

 

Rev. Lara Cowtan

Interim MInister

 

Summer in the Interim

As Canadian Unitarian Universalists, we envision a world in which our interdependence calls us to love and justice.  (CUC Vision Statement)

Welcome Summer!!!

Getting ready to head into some holiday time, it has been heartening and affirming to look back on the past year with UCV.  It has been quite a year.  We have all changed and grown through the challenges, both individually and as a religious community. We have adapted to new ways of being together when “the way things have always been” could no longer be.

Groups and committees began to meet online, and many now say they will continue with this convenient format.

The UCV Choir produced a tremendous December Candle Light Service that has had  almost 750 online views! The creativity, talent and resilience of the choir leads produced more than 70 hymns for regular Sunday services, ensuring that we could all sing along to favourite tunes, led by familiar faces and voices.

The dedicated Buildings and Grounds volunteers continued their tireless work to maintain the campus and plan exciting upgrades to the sanctuary space and facilities.

Environment, social action and refugee committees barely slowed down during the pandemic restrictions, finding new ways to engage.  A new IBPOC group has led impactful worship services and raised awareness and conversation around Asian, Indigenous and Black history and heritage in Canada, working with allies to build a more welcoming, inclusive and multicultural community within UCV and in the broader world.

We responded as a community when incidences of violence and hatred impacted marginalized people and indigenous communities. We have constantly renewed our commitment to advocate for love and justice by working to dismantle systems of racism and oppression. We have grieved together in ritual, ceremony and action and found sources of hope and renewal to carry us forward.  We are engaging in local and national conversations leading the way to address the systems of racism within our own lives and institutions — as detailed in the report by the Dismantling Racism Study Group CUC Dismantling Racism Final Report 2021 — and charting a path forward together in covenantal conversation — “A Way Forward for the 8th Principle Process”

Forward. Looking towards September when we hope to be able to gather once again in person for worship services and programs on the UCV campus, while also continuing to serve our growing virtual community with multi-platform live-streaming on Sundays.

During this unprecedented year of being a distant, virtual congregation, many things have been changing behind the scenes in preparation for coming back together with renewed capacity and expanded opportunities with programs for all ages and upgrades to the beautiful sanctuary space creating ways of gathering that are open to the imagination.

We will grow into the new organizational design that is detailed in this newsletter, which will enhance how programs and teams work collaboratively and help to developing sustainable goal-oriented leadership and volunteer structures.

All in all, this has been a monumental year, and I feel so very blessed and grateful for having been here with you all, through all the challenges and heartache, growth and learning.  Feeling very ready for a summer break, and also very excited for the year ahead.

May you all have a restful, healthy and inspiring summer.

Brightest blessings,

Rev. Lara Cowtan

Interim Minister.

 

Ministerial Transition

There have been two forums in 2021 to discuss the work of the Ministerial Transition Team. You can find information and video recordings on the forum pages:
Forum: Ministerial Task Force Recommendations, Feb. 28, 2021

Forum: Next Steps, March 7, 2021

 

The Rethinking Our Identity workshop, based on 8 thought-provoking questions, is the focus for the current (May-Nov.) Identity phase of our ministerial transition. This May E-Bulletin article – Rethinking Our Identity – Ministerial Transition Team – provides info and background about this transition phase and the workshop. All members are invited to participate in this important transition activity – contact  identityproject@vancouverunitarians.ca.

 

The following paragraphs explain and describe the ministerial transition process we embarked on in September, 2020.

The Unitarian experience shows that it’s best to have a period of transition after a settled minister leaves so that we can, collectively, honour our past, examine both our strengths and our limitations, and strengthen our ties as we prepare to move forward.

This intentional transitional period is an opportunity for some breathing space, to honour and let go of the past and to move into the future with renewed intention. It is a time during which we can review our goals, examine both our strengths and our limitations, assess our programs, rethink how we make decisions, determine the ways we can be more inclusive, and strengthen our ties as we prepare to move forward and to grow into and own our identity, independent of the past ministry. This is the future we will create together, as a community of faith.

Our intentional transition can be exciting, even transformative, when we engage fully in self-examination and renewal. The period of interim ministry is not a time to sit back; it’s a time to re-examine who we are and what we want, to step up and into the future we envision, to build a bridge from what was to what will be.

We will, in this transition process, review our history, evaluate our present, identify our strengths and needs, clarify our vision and then be well positioned to choose the right minister to accompany us into our chosen future. These are the tasks that we as a congregation must complete in order to successfully navigate the transition from one settled ministry to the next.

Our interim minister, Reverend Lara Cowtan, will guide us through this process, providing a fresh perspective and holding up a mirror so we can see ourselves, our strengths, and our needs more clearly. She cannot do this work for us, but she will guide us, with important support from the Ministerial Transition Team (MTT)

Here are some of the ways the Ministerial Transition Team will support our transition:

  • We will help people in our community to better understand interim ministry as a congregation-enhancing and enriching process of review, reflection, discovery and rediscovery, connection and reconnection
  • We will share information and resources – articles, books, talks, videos.
  • We will provide guidance and structure for some of the key tasks, or projects, we will take on to help us navigate this transition
  • We will provide regular updates on where we are, how we are doing, what we are learning, and where we are going

We see our role as helping us all to walk together as we explore and traverse The Road Ahead. We can, so we must. We are doers.

Our UCV Congregational History Wall

You are invited to contribute to the UCV Congregational History Wall. There are two ways to participate: you may contribute to the in-person history wall (in Hewett Centre) where a member of the Ministerial Transition Team will help you to write your recollections and affix them at appropriate points (by appointment only). You may also contribute to our history wall online! Photos, writing, and documents are all welcome contributions. Click “learn more” to see examples of contributions, and find more information about how to participate.

Learn More About the History Wall

 

Our Team

The members of the MTT are Lynn Armstrong, Rob Dainow, Olivia Hall, Leslie Hill, Michael O’Neil, Paul Prescod, Tamiko Suzuki, and Naomi Taylor. Please contact any of us if you want to know more about our interim ministry transition and the work of the MTT

A Message from Reverend Lara about our Congregational History Wall, Oct. 11, 2020

“The UCV Congregational History Wall is a key piece in our work together, the telling of the story of UCV, the whole story. A multi-dimensional portrayal of all the celebrations, achievements, characters, milestones, the hard times and the good, the silly anecdotes and heartbreaking losses and even some uncomfortable truths. Like all stories, the learning is in the layers, in the angles and multiple voices. From this, you will see where you have come from, where you are now and be able to look with clarity into the future. Please, add your voice to UCV’s story.”

Excerpt: Lara's Remarks From Sept 13 Service
This transitional period is an opportunity for some breathing space, to honour and let go of the past and move into the future with renewed intention. It is a time during which the congregation can review its goals, assess its programs, rethink how decisions are made and determine if there are ways to be more inclusive. This is a time for UCV to “tune up” for a new era, to grow into and own its identity, independent of the past ministry. Intentional transition can be exciting, even transformative, when devoted to self-examination and renewal. A palate cleanser, one might say.

During our time together, you will be reviewing your history, evaluating your present, identifying your strengths and needs, clarifying your vision and choosing the minister who will accompany you into that chosen future. These are the tasks a congregation must complete in order to successfully navigate the transition from one settled ministry to the next. I cannot do this work for you, but I will guide you with the Transitions Team

Excerpt: The History, Philosophy, and Impact of Interim Ministry”, by Margaret Keip – In The Interim
Interim ministry intentionally focuses on what we do when life happens and the future breaks open.

Interim ministry engages with the downsides and upsides of life, of change. It builds a bridge from what was to what will be.

If the interim minister is to help a congregation reap the benefits of working through the interim tasks, the first job is to get them to slow down, pay attention, and commit themselves to taking the time required.

The congregation is trailblazing its way into its future with the present help of this hired guide—present as in “here and now”; present as in “freely given.” Transition times are alive with opportunity—to discover, to explore, to practice, to try on ideas without necessarily having to commit to them first. And the freedom inherent in such fluid experience is transformative for a congregation.

Interim ministry requires a consultant attitude. The congregation is a you, not a we. And always there is the implied if: If you want to become, in fact, the congregation you say you dream of being, these are the issues you need to attend to.

From: “The History, Philosophy, and Impact of Interim Ministry”, in Kron, Keith, In the Interim: Strategies for Interim Ministers and Congregations, Second Edition, 2017.
__________________________
* Margaret Keip served the Unitarian Universalist Church of the Monterey Peninsula for 25 years with her co-minister husband, Fred. She went on to serve as interim minister to 6 congregation, all but one in the Pacific Western region. She is now contentedly retired in Grants Pass, Oregon.

Excerpt: UUA Transitional Ministry Handbook - What is Transitional Ministry?
Transitional ministry covers the time when a congregation is under intentional transition from one ministry to the next. Most people think of interim ministry as transitional ministry, and it is that. A congregation moves from one settled ministry to its next settled ministry with the help of an interim minister, who assists the congregation on this journey.
Excerpt: Coming to Terms with History, by David Keyes – from In The Interim
“Every congregation lives in dialogue with its past. Every congregation is strengthened immeasurably by its history, but every congregation has also been deeply wounded by its past. It is both the heir and the victim of its story. Affection transition ministry begins with a long look in the rearview mirror, where we must read the admonition: ‘Objects may be closer than they appear.’”
Excerpt: from Lara's Briefing Email
The fundamental transition period tasks of the congregation, framed as Focus Points, are to successfully navigate the:

HERITAGE– Reviewing how the congregation has been shaped and formed.
LEADERSHIP– Reviewing the member needs and its ways of organizing and developing new and effective leadership
MISSION– Defining and redefining sense of purpose and direction
CONNECTIONS– Discovering all the relationships a faith community builds outside of itself
FUTURE– Developing congregational and pastoral profiles

One of the first exercises we will do is create an interactive congregational history. The TT would assist in advertising for this activity and arrange meetings to engage people to do this online. Also, creating regular monthly newsletter articles to keep people involved and aware of what to expect during the transition time.

Excerpt: from the Janus Workbook

The five developmental task that a congregation in the interim must accomplish if its successor ministry is to be effective.

  • Claiming and honoring its past and healing its griefs and conflicts
  • Illuminating the congregation’s unique identity, its strengths, its needs, and its challenges.
  • Clarifying the multiple dimensions of leadership, both ordained and lay, and navigating the shifts in leadership that accompany times of transition.
  • Renewing connections with available resources within and beyond the UUA.
  • Enabling the congregation to renew its vision, strengthen its stewardship, prepare for new professional leadership, and engage its future with anticipation and zest.

More tersely, in the earlier Alban publication, Critical Moment of Ministry, Loren Mead identified these tasks as:

  • Coming to terms with history.
  • Discovering a new identity.
  • Allowing needed leadership to emerge.
  • Renewing denominational linkages.
  • Committing to new directions in ministry.

These five tasks address the developmental challenges facing a congregation in transition.

Excerpt: From the Interim Ministry Covenant
One of the vital tasks a congregation in transition needs to accomplish during its interim is to understand its history, anger, grief, habits and achievements.

1.2.5.1 Heritage: Reviewing how the Congregation has been shaped and formed; encouraging and hearing all of the stories about the Congregation’s past, as the foundation upon with the present rests; and embracing the rich variety that makes up the Congregation.

1.2.5.2 Leadership: Reviewing the membership needs and its ways of organizing and developing new and effective leadership; providing opportunity for individuals and the Congregational organization to examine the types of leadership needed for new leaders to emerge, and for seasoned leaders to recommit or to refocus their gifts.

1.2.5.3 Mission: Defining and redefining sense of purpose and direction; clarifying the faith community’s identity and core values; working to develop, update, and revitalize mission and vision statements; and reviewing strategic and tactical plans including stewardship and the financial health of the congregation.

1.2.5.4 Connections: Discovering and revitalizing all the association, interfaith, and community relationships a congregation builds outside of itself; and re-assessing old links and considering new ones.

1.2.5.5 Future: Developing congregational and pastoral profiles that position the congregation for its next ministry, including a healthy and honest assessment of the other focus points so that the congregation can turn its energy toward proactive decision-making for the future.

UCV Site Redevelopment

In December 2016 the then Board of Trustees of UCV established a committee to investigate the merits of partially redeveloping the UCV campus while retaining ownership of all of the property.

This investigation has two goals; 1) to establish whether or not redevelopment will contribute to long-term financial security and sustainability for the church and 2) to establish whether or not it will make a contribution to much-needed affordable, non-market housing in Vancouver.


Vision Statement

At this mid-century point of its life, our vision for the campus of the Unitarian Church of Vancouver for the next 50 years is that of a compelling, beautiful, intergenerational home for Unitarians to worship and to celebrate, one respectful of the original design, one that provides an affordable place to live for a cross-section of our community, and a place for all Vancouverites to gather for spiritual enquiry, to enjoy arts and culture, and to engage in dialogue and action on matters of social justice and the environment.

The project must help ensure the long-term stewardship of the UCV assets in a financially and operationally sustainable way into the next 50 years.


Latest Project Updates

Letter from Gordon Gram, Michael Clague Co-Chairs, and the Campus Redevelopment Planning Committee

Letter of Transmittal: Business Plan for Proposed Campus Redevelopment April 3, 2020


Forum Topics and Dates

TBD – Due to Covid, many forums have been postponed. We will post updated information if these are rescheduled online


Concerns and Responses

Members of the Redevelopment Committee and Board of Trustees have distilled the principal concerns expressed in Board meetings and Forum sessions and have provided responses to them based on the work of the committee and others.

Please click HERE to view the current concerns and responses document.


Resources and Documentation

Business Plan (Final Draft)

Click HERE for a PDF version of the Final Draft April 2020.
Note: The version hosted here contains compressed images. For a full-resolution copy, please email Marie Witt (findmariewitt@gmail.com)

 

Redevelopment Feasibility Study (Final Draft)

Click HERE for a PDF Version.
Note: The version hosted here contains compressed images. For a full-resolution copy, please email Marie Witt (findmariewitt@gmail.com)


Related Projects and Committees 

The UCV Redevelopment Committee is dedicated to the research and planning for campus redevelopment. Decision making, regulations, by-laws, and votes are handled by the Board.

Additional research into the future financial sustainability of UCV is reviewed by the Financial Sustainability Taskforce.


Questions and Feedback

For information on Redevelopment: Co-chairs Gordon Gram (gordongram@me.com) Michael Clague (mclague@telus.net)

For information on Financial Sustainability: Keith Wilkinson (keithwilkinsonconsulting@gmail.com)

For information on the consultation process: Diane Brown, board chair  (diane@rubyslippers.ca)

A bang command for UCV on DuckDuckGo

There are some good reasons for using the DuckDuckGo search engine and even for making it the default search engine on your browser so you can just type search terms right into the location bar (address bar) at the top of your screen.

This post goes into just one reason: the bang command. If you click on that link and then scroll down, you can see why bang commands are useful.

The bang commands in this post link to their results so you don’t have to type them into your browser to try them out. Just click on them.

!ucv principles for kids / for grownups too (see link in item found)
!ucv small groups / where everyone has a voice and is heard
!ucv vision statement / !g “… exactly what it says on the tin”

Those examples used the new bang command !ucv
/ (given nothing to search for on a website, a bang command displays the home page)

Even if you don’t make DuckDuckGo the default search engine on your browser, you can maybe still use it in the browser search box. This is usually to the right of the location bar (address bar) at the top of your screen, as it is in Firefox.  Click on the dropdown symbol – if there is one in the search box – and select a miniature version of the featured image in this post after you have typed the search term.

Here are some other bang commands worth knowing:

!yt Vancouver Unitarians / YouTube

!gb “Singing the Living Tradition” / Google Books

!gr “Singing the Living Tradition” / Goodreads

!b becoming a Unitarian site:cuc.ca / Bing

!i Vancouver Unitarians  / images

!m Unitarian Church of Vancouver, 949 West 49th Ave, Vancouver, BC V5Z 2T1  / map

!ucv technology / drop-in sessions, first Sundays, for help with any or all of the above

Please spread the word. Send people this copy-paste of the title of the post with its embedded link:

A bang command for UCV on DuckDuckGo

Thank you.

What Do We Call Ourselves? Forum

Missed the “What Do We Call Ourselves?” Oct. 20th Forum?

Read All About it.

If you missed the October 20th Forum on “What Do We Call Ourselves?” (WDWCO?) you can find the agenda and presentations below. Twenty-three people attended. Pasted below are the WDWCO? (draft) Terms of Reference.

1.WELCOME (Sheila Resels)

“Welcome to the “What do we call ourselves?” Task Force Forum.

So who are we?  My name is Sheila Resels.  I am one of co-chairs of the Task Force, along with my co-chair Eva Allan.  Members include Leonie Armstrong, (past chairperson), Jeannie Corsi, John Smith, Fouad Hafiz and advisors Mary Bennett, Steven Epperson, Keith Wilkinson and Tamiko Suzuki.

What is this Task Force?

The Task Force was approved by the Board 2 years. ago.  It was originally called the “Name Change Task Force”.  (more…)