Climate Change

Do Trees have Rights?

Unitarians promise to “affirm and promote respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part.” Some recent, and truly remarkable, court cases and legislation are making this affirmation even more meaningful. In view of our principles and the sources of our living tradition, and in honour of Tu B’Shevat – the festival of trees and the environment – exploring the legal standing of trees, rivers and the land seems particularly relevant today. ( BTW it’s bring a friend Sunday.) The Chalice Choir sings Order of Service: Listen:

Is Nature Thriving?

It may come as quite a surprise, but there’s a growing dissident view coming from some ecologists that nature is not about to give up. While some news is really bad, nature may be thriving in spite of, and in many instances because of, human engagement with the world. The Chalice Choir sings Order of Service: Listen:

The Future: Pessimistic or Optimistic?

Recently, I was asked this question: “Are you pessimistic or optimistic about the future?” To be sure, there are reasons enough to be less than cheerful about what is to be. And yet, and yet… I want to share a real story about a shepherd in northern England that gives me hope. This is a First Sunday of the month, so it’s an all ages, whole congregation worship service. Prepare to meet some sheep! Listen:

The Wicked Problem of ‘What’s for Dinner?’

Dr. Bomford will explore some of the far-reaching social and environmental impacts of our daily food choices and their relevance to the seven Unitarian principles. Decisions about what we should eat can become a problem when we have competing influences and incomplete, often contradictory, information. Such problems can be called “wicked”, meaning that they are shifting, multi-faceted, and resist solution. Some choices may be better or worse than others but they are not definitively right or wrong. XKCD cartoon referenced in this sermon. Listen: References Survey on Food Policy     Go directly to Survey USC Canada Food Policy (More about Michael Bomford)