Meet some of our active members here. To see all of the posted testimonials, click here.

I’ve been told that people join the Unitarian (Universalist) movement for one reason and stay for other reasons. That’s partly true for me, but the main reason I stay is the same reason I joined 20 years ago – UCV, (Xundaohui, 寻道会, Seekers of the Way), is a community and physical space that helps me focus on living by principles that I value in the company of others who share those values.

I first came to UCV to attend a memorial service for a friend who had led a too short and rather unorthodox life. I was deeply moved by how the lay chaplain honoured and celebrated that life without doctrinal overlay. After the service I picked up a pamphlet that stated the UU principles and sources. I liked everything about them and returned to the church on a subsequent Sunday morning where I was greeted by a personable and articulate minister and invited gently into a complex and elegant worship service—people in community honouring all lives and spirits. I was hooked.

(More about Keith)

 

When I jokingly made a new year's resolution to become spiritually developed and have matching towels, I had no idea where that would lead. This church was one of three religious groups I checked out back in 1989--and with all of its (and my) warts and all, this is what stuck. I joined in 1991 after "just browsing" for two years.

In 2017 Mary was awarded the Lifetime Member Award.

(More about Mary.)

I'm an actor, writer, college student and life-long Unitarian. Originally from Victoria BC, the traditional territory of the Leqwungen Nation, I grew up in First Unitarian Church of Victoria.

After taking an extended break from service attendance and being awake on Sunday mornings, although not from my UU identity, I began attending services here in 2010, when I moved to Vancouver as a young adult. (More about Leonie)

 

I was first introduced to the UU church and faith by a dear World Federalist colleague and long-time Unitarian who thought, given my love for being curious, asking questions, meeting interesting people and being open to new ideas, that I would find a home here.
The first service by Rev. Epperson he talked about climate change and politics. Having been raised all over the world and having been exposed to many religions and faiths I had not found any of them to be nearly as insightful, compassionate, all-encompassing as the Unitarian one seemed to be.

Read the full testimonial.

In no particular order, I am an award-winning director and actor, co-founder and long-time Artistic Director of Vancouver’s own Ruby SlippersTheatre. I am the 2017 recipient of the prestigious Bra D’Or award, a national award annually presented by the Playwrights Guild of Canada, in recognition of years of championing works by women. I am a mom. A Masters Degree in Theatre holder. A Unitarian.

There is a paradigm shift going on in the arts, and indeed within society, where inclusivity and diversity are major values of social change and justice. These are Unitarian values. I have been one of many at the forefront of this movement of diversity and inclusivity in the arts..

And thus I invite you to Advance Theatre at the Fringe this year. Every weekday 1:30 pm by donation.

Read about Diane's involvement and Advance Theatre: New Works by Diverse Women

As the daughter of two non-religious scientists, I was never interested in church. As a university student in Montreal I checked out the Unitarians but decided the Sunday services got in the way of skiing, hiking or just sleeping in.  Similarly, once I had a family, Sundays were for the kids’ hockey and soccer games.It wasn’t until five years ago, my kids grown up and gone, when my husband passed away suddenly, that I found a need to find a spiritual community.

I showed up at the North Shore Unitarian church and would sit in the back then slink home after the sermon. I felt I had nothing in common with all those white-haired West Van congregants until one day I joined some church elders at lunch after the service. We were sitting quietly enjoying the soup, when one grey haired lady suddenly slammed her fist on the table and said, “Can you believe what Stephen Harper just did?”  That started a rousing discussion about what was wrong with the latest bill in Ottawa. I sat up and knew right then that I had found my church!

A year later, I moved from North Van to Vancouver and purely because I didn’t want to spend  time commuting, joined UCV. I enjoyed the sermons and the music and this time I was more proactive. I started looking for a group to meet people and be able to help out. I found the Environment Team!

More about Tamiko Suzuki