Nametags help us make connections and build community

When you volunteer at the literature stall (the lit stall) after Sunday service, people come up to you with questions. Not all the questions are about copies of sermons.

“Can you help me with the name of that person, the one over there with their back to us?”

“Sorry, I can’t. Are they wearing a nametag?”

“No, that’s the problem. I spoke with them last Sunday. Now I can’t remember their name. And I don’t like to ask them.”

“Maybe they’re like Wendy Bryan (pictured, right) when she is at a no-nametag gathering.”

“How do you mean?”

“Wendy always says, ‘Thank you for asking. It’s Wendy Bryan. And feel free to ask me again the next time we meet. I won’t have remembered you asked me.’”

Nice. But hey.

That person you spoke with last Sunday and who seems to be avoiding you now may simply be too embarrassed to admit to you they can’t remember your name.

When you volunteer at the lit stall after Sunday service, people come up to you with questions. Not all of these people are wearing nametags. Asking for a friend: If you have a nametag, could you please wear it? And earn a silent thank-you from that friend.

Wearing your nametag helps us all. Nametags help us make connections and build community.

Karen Bartlett and Nancy Strider are wearing yellow nametags at the welcome table (picture, above left) by the entrance to Hewett Centre. If you’re a visitor, ask whoever is at the welcome table wearing a yellow nametag to direct you to the lit stall and to the sermon discussion table.

 


The above is a lit stall post. In the bulleted list below are the three latest posts with that tag.

If you haven’t read it already, please see the post about lit stall posts for more information.


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